Posts Tagged ‘Consultant’

Getting Back in the Game with Coach Nancy

Wednesday, November 6th, 2019

There are specific concerns around finding employment for people with vision loss, but so much of the process is universal.

Head shot of Nancy Karas
Nancy Karas is an HR Leader and Executive Coach. She’s worked with corporate clients, private clients and group coaching to help people find their happiness.

Hear how the job search process may have changed since the last time you were in the game. Learn strategies to improve your online networking, find your dream job and increase your productivity.

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Resources

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:
Welcome back!

My name is Thomas Reid. If this is your first time here, I’m the host and producer of Reid My Mind Radio, a podcast bringing you stories of compelling people impacted by all degrees of blindness and disability.

The objective is to reach those who are adjusting to vision loss or disability. I’m hopeful that the experiences of those who have travelled similar journeys will provide real information and encouragement to those new to vision loss.

For so many, acquiring vision loss or another disability can occur in the middle of a career. For others it could take place in that early phase.

There are definitely challenges and considerations that are unique to those with vision loss, but much of the process of finding employment is applicable to us all.

Today on the podcast, I’m bringing you an expert to talk a bit about the process of finding employment. So if you’ve been out of the job hunting game and suddenly find yourself back on the field, you’re going to want to hear from the coach!

Let’s play ball!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro

NK:

I teach people to be the CEO of their own life and career. No matter what life throws at us.

TR:

This is Nancy Karas. She’s an HR Leader and Executive Coach experienced
in building healthy companies.

I kind of like the sports metaphor I used in the intro so let’s call her Coach Nancy!

NK:

In addition, I focus on helping people to find their own version of happiness and success.

TR:

Coach Nancy understands this personally. Spending over 25 years in HR leadership roles throughout corporate America until the relationship became adversarial.

NK:

I had to fight management to get people what they deserve.

After 9/11 I felt really discouraged. I was in the middle of New York City, had been living there for 20 years and I just decided that I really wanted to help people unencumbered. So I stepped out of corporate and I started coaching.

TR:

That included working with corporate clients, private clients and group coaching to help people find their happiness. And if you think that’s something people inherently know, think again.

NK:

There’s a very big difference between what we do well and what we love to do. Sometimes we’re confused and we think that because we do it well, because we get good pay for it, because people recognize us for it that we love it. But sometimes our currencies change as a human being and maybe money and praise and title aren’t the most important thing anymore. I help people to really figure out what is the right thing for them next. What is their next step in life. I base it around what fits you.

TR:

Next step, in life, after for example a life change. That could be the loss of a career, loved one, maybe even acquiring a disability, the specifics don’t necessarily matter. Often we’re trying to answer the same question.

NK:

What’s the best thing for me right now? What will make me happy? What will make me feel successful in whatever way I’m searching for success; money, fulfillment, to make a difference in this world, or whatever it might be. That’s what I help people to figure out.

TR:

A life change can make this question feel more urgent. Even more difficult to answer.

NK:

We feel like the power is taken away from us by other people and we give away our power.

I help people to realize they’re already wearing the ruby slippers and that you have the power within you to do whatever you want.

So I teach people how to take back their power, raise the bar for themselves and really do what’s best for them.

TR:

Whatever the decision is, Coach Nancy is all about helping people achieve their goals.

With an understanding that whatever the personal challenge is, we all have our unique strengths and weaknesses.

NK:

I help people to showcase their strengths and find a way to harbor their weaknesses so they’re seen as a positive.

I give people that confidence and that boost they need to go out there and get what they deserve.

TR:

Before we head out onto the field, we need to know how best to play the game.

NK:

traditionally the way we were taught is a very me centric approach. I’m looking for a job where I can grow. Where I can have this and that.

In today’s market you have to approach your search in a I’m here to assist you. Whomever your target is that you’re looking to work for.

TR:

the means of doing this?

NK:

Through the resume, conversations, meetings, interpersonal skills, self-esteem, emotional intelligence. All the different pieces.

## Resume Style

TR:

Let’s take a look at some of the tools we have to help craft our play book.

First mentioned was the resume. That first representation not only of a person’s work experience but the individual them self.

NK:
[
Some people’s resumes I see are four and five pages long. Nobody’s going to read that anymore. Think about technology, everything is moving so rapidly. People don’t concentrate for very long on anything that’s on their computer screen. they listen to it for a second and then they’re distracted, it’s like hey squirrel! They’re gone.
]
We have to abbreviate what we give to people now. If it’s not relevant and applicable to the particular job you’re searching for and it’s going to cloud their ability to see how you’re a fit. We really have to look at resumes now and be more functional than chronological.

TR:

For many, vision loss or an acquired disability results in the loss of a job, or reduced responsibilities.

Rather than highlighting jobs you may choose to highlight skills and experience.

NK:

In a more functional modern resume you bring whatever is relevant. it’s like a tapestry if we’re pulling the gold threads out of our tapestry because we only want the very best of the best. If we’re looking for the gold company that we want to work for we’re only going to pull our gold threads. Maybe the silver threads show that we started silver and moved up to gold. That’s great, but if we have blue, yellow pink, whatever color threads, they have nothing to do with the gold company. So we’re not going to throw them all our threads and they’re like what the heck!

It’s a new way of presenting ourselves.

TR:

But how would you account for jobs that you may have had to take that don’t necessarily highlight your real skill set or are applicable to your desired career path?

NK:

I was freelancing. I was consulting and here are the companies I worked for and you just bullet or include a couple of those companies.

TR:

Coach Nancy strongly recommends your resume doesn’t exceed two pages.

Go ahead and Google sample functional resumes.

there’s even a hybrid version that combines aspects of the traditional chronological resume with the functional.

No matter what format you choose, consider how you approach the next step.

NK:

The traditional way of job search was to look at the job postings or ads and then we would send a letter and a resume and you’d sit and wait and hope that you’d hear back. But technology has advanced our abilities to connect. We have an opportunity now to shortcut our job search.

These days you can really bridge yourself to that other party by doing a lot of homework. try to understand a little about them and the direction they’re headed.

You’ve leveled the playing field because you walk in that room and now you can talk about how you can help them. how your skills are a fit for them.

## Researching Companies

TR:

technology has made researching companies a lot easier and way more convenient. you’re already familiar with some of the tools, but are you using them effectively?

NK:

I love Google. If I want to know what does someone at Bloomberg make if they work in the Finance department at a VP level, that’s exactly what I’m going to type in.

We look at the first or second thing that pops up when we google and then go “eh didn’t find anything!” I click on everything on that page. Sometimes I go to the second google page because I’m looking for information about the company that’s going to give me a hint about their culture, about their work, about their progress.

TR:

Surprisingly, to me at least, ascertaining information about a corporate culture online is possible.

NK:

I first Google what is the culture at Bloomberg. See what comes up. I would also go to Glass Door.com.

Glass Door.com is a website . You have to be willing to anonymously take one of your former jobs and list that you were a programmer or that you were an HR Executive and you give feedback on that former company. It was good it was fair and then you could give specific comments and feedback. Once you do that you have access to Glass Door. And when you’re in Glass Door you can look up any company. There’s tons of information about salary ranges. What people are making in New York for that job, Philly, Georgia. It will also give you some feedback. people are saying it’s a great company but the leadership is never in the office and we can never get answers. If I see one person say it I think well!

TR:

You’re really looking for trends. But you can take all information into consideration during interviews.

NK:

Let’s say people are saying that the company promises bonuses and never gives them. I would make sure when I interview to ask, I’m curious about your bonus structure. Do you give bonuses? Oh, yes we do! Has there ever been a year where you weren’t able to give the bonus you promised? And then you watch them go uh, uh, or they say no we never had that. So you get to talk it out and see for yourself.

TR:

The idea here is to equip yourself with as much information as possible to make sure the company is a fit for you.

Another important part of the playbook; networking.

NK:

Networking is taking place virtually and in person. In person you should look for events where they’re specifically having an event or where it’s industry specific or job specific to you. For example, if I’m HR I want to go to HR conferences. If I can’t afford those big conferences independently of the company paying for it then you go to a one day event or you go to an evening lecture for an hour in HR where you know it’s going to draw the HR community.

##TR:

Whatever the venue, Coach Nancy says it’s not about making sure everyone has your business card.

NK:

What I teach my clients to do is rather than focus on handing out your info, collect info. Now You’re in charge of your next step. Now it’s up to you to figure out where it’s going to go. I wait two or three days after that meeting and then I send them a note on Linked In.

TR:

That’s Linked In.com, the virtual way to network.

NK:

You want to put a professional profile up on Linked In. Let’s say you have a little profile with nothing there and no photo people know that you’re not current.

[TR in conversation with NK:]

I know you’re talking to me Nancy … (laughs) Go ahead!

NK:

I’m talking to you Thomas.

TR:

I know she’s right. And even though I’m not looking for a job, Linked In still makes a lot of sense for someone like me.

NK:

Especially for your marketing and stuff for your show.

I’ve heard CEO’s say that Linked In is their Rolodex. To me it’s a treasure chest. I can find all kinds of people. I help in so many different industries. Linked In has so many capabilities also as a tool. To search, connect with people, post jobs, to apply to jobs.

TR:

That’s the beauty of online networking. The ability to find the connections while you’re in your pajamas!

NK:

It’s called direct contact.

TR:

. In theory this approach can make the job search process more accessible. It definitely puts you in control.

Here’s how it works.

NK:

Go onto Linked In. find the person who would be the hiring manager or if you’re senior enough in your career and your job function would be very senior in the company , I would write directly to the CEO.

TR:

It’s possible that the majority of those listening are on the CEO level, but No matter what level you occupy in the corporate structure, the process is the same. Sending a note directly to the person through Linked In.

NK:

you want to show them that you see why they’re special and you’ve got the goods to support the direction they’re going. So I say I recognize you and what makes you special. It’s so exciting to me or thrilling or I’m so passionate about the work you do. I believe I could be an immediate and significant contributor to your project, to your team, to your company or to your mission. Here’s specifically what I bring to the table. Bullet, bullet, bullet, bullet. Then would love to set up a meeting or take you out for a cup of coffee or set up a call. Whatever you feel comfortable with.

TR:

Coach Nancy shared an example of someone who wanted to leave their job. The right question dictated the next steps.

NK:

Why not get you your dream job? Tell me what it is. She wanted to work for Google. So we looked to see do we know anybody at Google. How did we do that? We went on Linked In, we looked in the search bar, typed in Google and then we filtered on people. All the people that work for google come up in that search and it’ll tell you if you’re a first, second or third connection.

TR:

What if you don’t have a dream job? Maybe the idea of a traditional job is more of a nightmare. For whatever reason!

NK:

We’re not happy at work. We’re not enjoying our work. We don’t want to commute anymore. We’re physically, emotionally or mentally challenged and cannot make that trip or do that grind everyday whatever it might be. And if that’s the case this is the perfect decade for that right now because more and more companies are allowing people to work from home or to work from a We Work or some other center where people can just go locally if they want to be in a shared setting. there are so many nontraditional jobs.

TR:

here’s a method for thinking and mapping out opportunities.

NK:

What I like to suggest is that people think of a food chain.

TR:

The idea here is to identify the industry connections based on the things that are of interest to you. Therefore, the beginning point is based on a certain set of questions.

NK:

Where am I right now? Where is my interest? Where is my challenge? What is my life about right now?

I’ll give you an example. You lost your sight and you found your way to developing your podcast, your show and all the stuff you do to support people who are going through the same challenges.

TR:

So in this example, this identifies the starting point of the chain. Now I need to figure out all of the opportunities or players in the industry.

NK:

You look at corporate opportunities, nontraditional associations or foundations. And you look all around and say who is in this field that I might work for that’s not the straight and direct line of what I thought I might do. It’s thinking outside of the box. And when you do sometimes you find jobs that you never even knew existed.

TR:

Maybe the jobs are based on the traditional employer employee relationship. perhaps they’re more like opportunities for freelancing or consulting that work for your lifestyle. Either way, attitude makes a difference!

NK:

I suggest first of all that people think and act all the time as if they were a consultant. Because consultants never have all the answers. That’s not our job. Our job is you tell me your problem, I’ll figure it out. I will get you the answers.

TR:

I think it’s fair to say that work is different now. The days of working for a company for 30 years are gone.

NK:

So people are forced to become more resilient, more flexible, more autonomous in their careers. You’re really your own boss, your own CEO and you’re going from company to company and you’re consulting whether you go in as a full time in house person or you actually consult for them.
But this way And the concept of finding a job one time

TR:

It may all sound tiring and hard to manage. But Coach Nancy has a method for managing it all. Just think of the ducks. You know the ones at a carnival or fair.

NK:

That booth where there’s a bunch of yellow ducks and everybody’s squirting the gun to squirt your duck and push it up to the top of the hill. The person who gets their duck up to the top first is the winner. In this game, in my head what we do is we line up the ducks.

TR:

Where each duck is a stand in for one of our tasks or responsibilities on that good old’ to do list.

That could look something like;

Edit the next podcast episode, [Audio: Quack!]
Research future guests and show ideas, [Audio: Quack!]
Finish that spreadsheet, [Audio: Quack!]
Clean the garage, [Audio: Quack!]

Now, back to the carnival and all the ducks.

NK:

Now the goal is not to race one duck to the top, we tend to do that in life sometimes. We pick one thing and we only focus on that. But then what happens is we’re at the top with one accomplishment and nothing else is moved forward.

TR:

Even worse, what about the days when you just don’t feel like pushing that stupid duck. [Audio: Quack!]
Sorry, it’s just sometimes you’re not feeling in the mood for spreadsheets, so You decide to read an article and next thing you know it’s the end of the day and you have nothing accomplished.

NK:
[
Pick another duck!

Maybe it’s the garage you’ve been meaning to clean out and it’s a beautiful afternoon. So instead of sitting inside and feeling depressed by pushing a different duck forward an easier duck that day, we still end the day feeling accomplished. Now the garage is half cleaned out! We start to create our own momentum. Momentum creates more momentum.

TR:

Who doesn’t like feeling accomplished at the end of the day?

I’m a fan of the duck approach, but you can use whatever works for you.

NK:

You have to keep in those parameters that it’s always something productive.

[TR in conversation with NK:]

Laughs… Sitting back and getting a six pack or something like that doesn’t count right?
Laughs to fade out

NK:

Uh no! No!

I think if you’re lost or stuck you really want to reach out to someone who’s walked your path before. Whether it’s professionally, personally. Just like people in AA have a mentor it’s really good for human beings to have somebody they could go talk to or get advice from. So whether it’s a therapist or coach or a support group, I think in order to move forward in life you do have to ask for help because that’s how we learn and grow.

[TR in conversation with MA:]
I might add one other thing to that is a podcast. And I’m not just promoting mine here (laughs) but in terms of you know having someone who’s walked that path, when you’re fearful about asking for help the thing that makes a podcast so cool is that you can get that information and nobody has to know that you’re getting it.

NK:

I love it! Very good advice.

And there’s so much good stuff out there. Not as good as yours…

[TR in conversation with MA:]
Thank you Nancy! Laughs…

NK:

your welcome !

There are so many resources on the internet. We really have to be our own advocate and we have to do our homework and really search.

TR:

We should be very used to that message. Being our own advocate.

I really do hope that this podcast is serving as a resource for those adjusting to vision loss.

So often it seems that the world has lowered the bar for those with disabilities. Whether it’s being falsely praised just for showing up or if it’s assuming you wouldn’t be able to do… [fill in the blank according to your own experience]

Shout out to Coach Nancy, her message is about empowering individuals not only when it comes to finding a job, but really, living your life.

[TR in conversation with NK:]

That makes you officially part of the Reid My Mind Radio Family!

NK:

Oh I love it! Thank you! Ohh!You just made my day. I love it!

[TR in conversation with NK:]

Laughs…

TR:

Can you guess how to contact Nancy?

NK:

Linked In. Nancy Karas (Then spelled out)
Instagram @Transition.Coach
I’m on Facebook, Transition Coaching and Career Management with Nancy Karas or you can just connect with me Nancy Karas. My website is www.Transition.Coach. No .com just .coach. My phone number is (661) 309-7055 and the email is HabitatForHR@gmail.com.

# Close

Big shout out to Coach Nancy! And check this out here, I am very happy to report that as of this episode, one of my [Quack, Quack!]ing ducks has finally reached the top. At least for now. I cleaned up my Linked In profile a bit. I added a pic, updated some other info and made it look current. In fact, I’d invite you all to connect with me on Linked In if you’re there. How’s that Coach!

You can also find me, well Reid My Mind Radio on Apple, Spotify, Google or where ever you get podcasts.

You can always send me feedback or recommend a guest or topic all you have to do is hollaback!

We have the comments section on the blog, ReidMyMind.com.
The email; ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com
The Reid My Mind Radio Feedback Line where you can leave a voice mail: 1 570-798-7343

I would really love voice messages that I can share on the podcast. If you don’t want to call, you can grab your smart phone and record a voice memo and email the finished recording to ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com.

I’d love to hear and share the voices of those who are listening. If you want to send a message but don’t want it shared just say so and it’s all good.

I appreciate you listening and if you liked what you heard please rate and even review the show via Apple Podcast. And please, tell a friend to listen. Spread the love, man!

You can always visit www.ReidMyMind.com, that’s R to the E I D like my last name!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

[Audio, Quack, Quack!]

Peace!

Audio: Quack!

Hide the transcript

Opportunities in the Creation of Audio Description

Wednesday, August 21st, 2019

As we continue looking at Audio description, we take a look at the opportunities for those within the Blind and Low Vision community to participate in its creation and not just as consumers.

Headshot of Colleen Connor and Guide Dog Joplin
Colleen Connor, co-founder of Audio Training Retreats & an Audio Description Quality Control Consultant is doing exactly that. We explore the challenges and some potential solutions, current ways to get involved and things being done to support future involvement from more Blind people.

Listen

###Resources

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:

What’s up Reid My Mind Radio Family.

I had to take a little break from the podcast. I’ll explain more about that in a future episode as its directly related both to this podcast and adjustment to blindness.

This episode is actually being posted on an off week. So that means expect to get another next week. In fact the two sort of support one another.

We’ll be moving forward with episodes every two weeks after that taking us through the end of the year, with a break beginning some time in December.
For now, let’s get it!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio IntroMusic

TR:

One question that I suppose is asked by just about anyone adjusting to becoming Blind as an adult, especially working age, is what sort of work can a Blind person do?

If this is your first time listening to this podcast, I’d encourage you to take a listen to the archives. We indirectly answer that question in many episodes where we profile different individuals most often impacted by some degree of blindness or low vision.

Today we’re going to continue with our look at Audio Description or what some around the globe call descriptive video. Specifically, the opportunities available for Blind and low vision people in the creation process.

To do this, I reached out to Colleen Connor. Colleen is a podcaster, web accessibility tester, Audio Description Consultant and Co-founder of Audio Description Training Retreats.

Diagnosed with Cone Rod Dystrophy as a child, Colleen lost most of her usable vision by her Junior year in high school.

CC:

I’m grateful to my parents because they didn’t treat me any differently. I’m a black belt in Tai Kwon Do, participated in school fully and never was held back from doing anything. And so you know I decided to super, super logically major in musical theater (Laughs…).

[TR in conversation with CC:]
Laughs…

CC:

because that’s so practical.
[TR in conversation with CC:]
What did your parents say about that, about that choice?

CC:

I think they just wanted me to be able to do what I wanted and what I was good at. They weren’t thrilled but they didn’t actively stop me. They knew how passionate I was about theater and acting and studying dialects and singing.

TR:

Colleen’s introduction to audio description isn’t what you might have suspected.

CC:
I ended up working in the Spy Museum in Washington DC. They had a described tour there but it was very out of date.

TR:

Guess what Colleen offered

CC:

Hey I’m visually impaired, can I update this for you. And I was too Naive to ask for money. Much like a lot of my work I did it for free.

I was in theater and musical theater almost my entire life and I had no idea that Audio Description existed. No one had ever told me about it. I didn’t know it was something I could ask for. Once I discovered the audio tours in museums someone mentioned to me about Audio Description of plays and musicals and live theater and I was blown away. And then of course I discovered that they were also doing Audio Description for film and television.

TR:

That project at the Spy Museum?

CC:

I rewrote this tour. I added some tactile elements. People were really impressed by it. I got hired by Cortina Productions after that to work on the audio tour of the George W. Bush Heritage Library and Museum in Texas.

TR:

Doing the work and having it well received is great, but AD meant more to Colleen.

CC:

This could be kind of my way back into theater. I started looking into it realizing that there isn’t a lot of training.

TR:

Maybe you’re familiar with the saying, get in where you fit in. That’s what Colleen did.

CC:

As those of us who can’t see we are the users of Audio Description. Therefore it’s my belief that we are your best source of quality control. We are your best source of feedback. One of the things that I started doing was critiquing people. So I would contact people whether it was from a live show or a TV show or film and I would say here are some notes about your description. I thought you did this well, I think this could be an improvement, I don’t think you should have used this voice artist. I started from a place of editing and critiquing.

[TR in conversation with CC:]

How was that received?

CC:

Sometimes it just straight up wasn’t. (Laughs…)
So my messages are somewhere in the ether, I’m sure. Other times people were amazed and then especially as far as live they were very hungry for feedback and critique because they do these shows and half the time nobody’s even listening to their description and so to get legitimate feedback. Some people have an ego about it they think they’re infallible but most of the time people are like thank you so much , what else.

So I realized in a sense it would be ideal if you have people teaching audio description or if someone was an audio describer to have a consultant who is visually impaired or blind who is a user of the experience.

TR:

While in the role of Quality Control Consultant during a conference, Colleen came across another opportunity.

CC:

I met my business partner Jan Vulgaropulos and she is a professional Audio Describer.

TR:

Jan, who specialized in live theater description had a question for Colleen.

CC:

Listen, I’m thinking of starting my own training. Would you do it with me and start a company?

I said yes, let’s do it lets create something new! We both decided that rather than a classroom kind of conference where you’re there for two days 8 to 5 with fluorescent lighting in a hotel trying to get the basics of Audio Description that we would create Audio Description Training Retreats, which is our company, and we would have people in sort of a natural environment . We would do courses in Audio Description . That has become part of my passion and my focus.

TR:

Back to the earlier question; what sort of work can Blind people do? In this case as it pertains to Audio Description.

CC:

I’m not only there to give the student’s feedback, I co-teach Audio Description. I help teach them about Disability awareness and the history of Audio Description, where it comes from. The update as to what’s going on now. We go over kind of our guidelines for helping people establish Audio Description.

And then my colleague does the actual description teaching. The main goal is to give people as much feedback and performance opportunity as possible. So we have our students do a lot of description.

TR:

The hands on approach enables these future describers to figure out what aspect of Audio Description they like.

CC:

Hey you know I like writing, but I don’t want to do the voice artist thing or I don’t think I could do live theater and just say what I’m seeing in real time that’s too hard. Or they might enjoy that challenge.

TR:

I don’t want to be one to say that something can’t be done based on the current process. It may appear that way until someone comes along and changes how it’s done.

Yes, right now, live description and writing the description for a film or television show requires sight. But wordsmithing doesn’t.

What are the other challenges for a Blind person to participate in this work?

How about narration?

CC:

When you are recording in a studio, what normally happens is the script is on one screen and then on the screen next to it the film or TV show is playing and it has the time stamps on it and the Sound Engineer will say ok you have three seconds to record this line will do it three times ready? And they will play the clip and you’re watching the clip and trying to say what’s on the script at the same time.

TR:

Ok, maybe it’s me but this doesn’t seem to be a real obstacle. It’s a process that’s currently in place but there’s no reason it couldn’t be done differently.
For example, a Sound Engineer could cue the Narrator.

A Narrator/Editor with time stamp info alone could easily run through and record and be sure that the narration falls as indicated.

CC:

I think if you were doing it independently you could be successful at it. I think some of the larger studios everything has to happen so fast in post-production that they’re like you have one day to do this. You have one day to record the Audio Description and they just don’t think Blind people can do it.

[TR in conversation with CC:]
Huh!

TR:

That sounds like the biggest obstacle to me, attitude.

CC:

As far as quality control, as far as the people who should be editing, I think that should be Blind people. We’re more attuned to consuming Audio Description as our means of delving into a story and we have more of a legitimate leg up to say something like this voice over artist is super annoying and takes you of the story. The script writer repeated this line twice. At one point in the scene you named this person this and now you’re calling him this. Those kind of things are what we would be more efficient at editing.

TR:

For example, tell me if you think there’s something off with this narration.

[Audio: Shooters Season 2]

This is from season 2 of a Netflix series called “Shooters”. No offense to the Narrator but why in the world is he practically singing every line. I had to abandon the series. I just couldn’t do it. This guy!

CC:

There is room for more employment for visually impaired and Blind people. It’s just a matter of the same that it every was which is unfortunately we have to break down the barriers. We have to be the ones to say , no like we can edit, we can be involved in this, we can be voice artist, like it can happen.

TR:

Colleen is currently a member of an ACB Committee tasked to create an AD Accreditation. They’re developing guidelines that define audio description and requirements for live theater, plays, movies and television.

CC:

It’s not just for the describers, we’re also going to be creating a certification for quality control or consumers of Audio Description. My goal is to make sure that Blind and visually impaired people have a chance to also be certified as quality control and as description consultants.

TR:

When it comes to standards and guidelines for creating Audio Description, there’s a lot of room for growth. How to handle diversity is just one question.

CC:

How much do you say about a person? How do you very quickly categorize somebody if you need a really short term for this one burly guy?What do you say? What’s appropriate to say? What terms are you going to use that may in five in a year, may be no longer appropriate?

A lot of times you may want to reference something, but the main default as far as guidelines will most likely be only if it’s relevant to the story do you need to reference something and then you need to keep in mind you have to reference for everybody because that’s why it would be significant.

TR:

To learn more about Audio Description Training Retreats you can reach them on Facebook or Twitter @ADRetreats or visit ADTrainingRetreats.com.

They have some trainings taking place this fall so go on over to the site and get all the information.

[TR in conversation with CC:]

And your podcast? The name and where can folks take a listen?

CC:

My personal kind of podcast and any of my videos and information can be found at BlindInspirationCast.com

TR:

I’ll have all of these links at ReidMyMind.com on the episodes post.

Shout out to Colleen Connor for taking the time to speak with me for this episode.

I think we may hear from her again in the future regarding AD and more. She and I have some things in common. For example, like when I asked her to try using headphones during our interview and I noticed she too like me enjoys making up songs about nothing.

CC:

Humming a tune…

“Getting my headset!”

[TR in conversation with CC:]

Laughs!

# Closing

TR:

Hey, I’m not sure if you all know this but right now, there’s an incredible sale taking place just about wherever podcasts are distributed.

It costs nothing, absolutely nada, free 99 to subscribe to a podcast including this one. So do yourself a favor and…

Subscribe!
Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, Stitcher, Tune In Radio or wherever you get podcasts.

You can always send me feedback or recommend a guest or topic all you have to do is hollaback!

We have the comments section on the blog, ReidMyMind.com.
The email; ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com
The Reid My Mind Radio Feedback Line where you can leave a voice mail: 1 570-798-7343

I would really love voice messages that I can share on the podcast. If you don’t want to call, you can grab your smart phone and record a voice memo and email the finished recording to ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com.

I’d love to hear and share the voices of those who are listening. If you want to send a message but don’t want it shared just say so and it’s all good.

I appreciate you listening and if you liked what you heard please rate and even review the show via Apple Podcast. And please, tell a friend to listen. Spread the love, man!

You can always visit www.ReidMyMind.com, that’s R to the E I D like my last name!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

Peace!

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