Posts Tagged ‘Bold’

Because We Are Captivating

Wednesday, October 9th, 2019

A professional headshot of Stephanae's smashing asymmetrical hairstyle with burgundy highlights. The muted Coral Cutie lipstick topped with a peach colored gloss provides a nice contrast against the gray backdrop. She is wearing a black dress and black tuxedo jacket trimmed in faux leather, silver statement necklace, and silver drop earrings.
Third time on the podcast, Stephanae McCoy is the co-founder of Captivating, an online magazine. Hear her journey from once believeing there was no future to empowering women with vision loss to see their Bold, Blind Beauty Captivating selves!
How did she start the magazine? What helped her find her purpose? And what’s her advice for others adjusting to vision loss? Plus Steph is a part of SPARK Saturday. #SparkSaturdayPCB)

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TR:

Welcome back to Reid My Mind Radio!

With each episode, I’m hopeful that we’re reaching someone new to vision loss. I know they are out there and I have a pretty good idea of what they’re experieencing. Mainly because I myself became Blind as an adult.

My name is Thomas Reid and I am host and producer of this hear podcast – which is all about sharing the stories of compelling people who themselves have some degree of blindness. From low vision to totally blind, like me!

In sharing our stories we begin to shatter the false beliefs and information about what it means to live with low vision, blindness or disability. Beliefs we may have never even realized we held. Notice I said we? Meaning you and I both. No one is immune.

For those interested in a different way of thinking,let’s go!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Yeah so you know how this works, this is your third time! (Laughs) Trifecta!

SM:

Laughing

My name is Stephanae McCoy and I am the founder of Bold Blind Beauty and online community with the purpose of empowering Blind and Visually Impaired women while connecting sighted and non sighted people. And I’m also the Co-Founder of Captivating.

TR:

That’s right, Steph is back on the podcast. I encourage you to check out her first and second episodes which I’ll link to from this episodes blog post over at ReidMyMind.com.

Today, let’s start with her most recent venture.

SM:

Captivating!

TR:

An online digital lifestyle magazine gearred to people with disabilities.

After witnessing the results of a friend and fellow Blind blogger’s make over, Steph reached out to the image consultant who performed the transformation.

SM:

Her name is Chelsea Nguyen. our first telephone conversation actually lasted three hours, the first time I met her. And we were just going on and on about the things we had in common.

TR:

But there are also differences.

SM:

Chelsea is not Blind. Chelsea does not have a disability, but Chelsea has a heart for people who do. And she specifically has a heart for people who are Blind and Visually Impaired. Being that she has had that experience working with Blind people she developed strategies to help Blind and visually Impaired people use non-visual techniques for applying makeup, taking care of their appearance and everything. She developped these things. I’m like we really gotta do something together.

TR:

Eventually the ideas turned into Captivating.

SM:

We were thinking about how people with disabilities are viewed broadly, especially if you have a visible disability. People stare at us a lot when we’re out here living our lives when we have a white cane or wheelchair or whatever.

TR:

Maybe that’s the gaze of seeing something unfamiliar, possibly fear or even ableism.

Whatever it is, Steph’s flipping it!

SM:

We think that when people are looking at us when we’re out here with our devices, that they’re looking at us because we are captivating.

TR:

That’s not her initial reaction to her vision loss in 2005. This attitude has it’s beginnings in 2009.

SM:

That’s when I was diagnosed legally Blind and had to look at some adaptations for work and life.

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Let’s say we’re back in 2009. Ok, so I remember how I felt in terms of my career and my future. Do you remember that time for you?

SM:

Oh my God yeah!

I had these plans. I had just gotten married like a year or so before. We had bought a house. I had just gotten a promotion at work and I just had all of these grand plans and it’s like now I’m legally Blind and now what

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Hmm.

SM:

You know?

[TR in conversation with SM:]
Yeah!

SM:

Before I connected with other organizations and other Blind people I just sort of thought that I had no future. I thought it was over.

TR:

TR:

That’s despair. An unforgettable emotion. She didn’t know it at the time, but she did have a way to take her from no future to Bold Blind Beauty to straight up Captivating?

SM:

even in the worst set of circumstances I would always think, there is always a way.

I didn’t know what that was going to look like but I knew there was going to be away that I could progress through this and I could adapt to it and grow with it. I didn’t think so at the time.

TR:

In the midst of pain, its hard to see how it can provide opportunity.

SM:

It wasn’t until I think I lost my sight and had to advocate on behalf of myself that it became clear to me what my real purpose was.

TR:

Steph’s earliest advocacy was as a mom.

SM:

My middle son had ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. When he was going to school because his behavior was so over the top, it was just very, very challenging trying to manage him especially being a single parent with two other children. I had to become my sons advocate. I didn’t even consider myself an advocate before he got diagnosed.

TR:

All set to discuss her son’s Individual Education Planwith a teacher and principal, Steph quickly realized she was unprepared when the attendees included several faculty and specialists.

SM:

That never happened again because after that I educated myself and I found out everything I need to know to be able to help my son and to be his advocate. Every time they would try to do something that I felt wasn’t Kosher, we would have to sit down and have a conversation. It was almost like a full time job.

TR:

Then there was advocacy from her perspective as a daughter.

SM:

My mother developed a disability in her later years. Her entire body was pulled to the left side so her head was almost touching the floor because of her Dystonia. She had reached a point where she was denied Social Security Disability three times. When you’re applying for Disability it’s a difficult process, but its made even more difficult once you’re denied the third time.

TR:

First step!

SM:

I got really angry, but on my way home I thought about it, I gotta sit back, think this through, do some research and then I started writing.

TR:

Writing a letter detailing her mothers situation including pictures and an invitation to visit. Addressed to the Social Security Administration.

SM:

I CC’d all of my representatives, her doctor and her attorney. Arland Spector’s office got involved and within six weeks my mother was getting the benefits that she rightly deserved.

TR:

The strength to move through challenges can come from all of our individual experiences.