Posts Tagged ‘Audio Description’

Reid My Mind Radio: On Black Panther Audio Description – Race, Selection & Time

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018

More on Black Panther? Well, yes, sort of! It’s really a good movie that raises some issues about Audio Description that need to be a part of AD conversations. In fact, these issues go further and touch on so called race and disability. I thought I’d begin here… Plus some suggestions as to how we can enhance the Audio Description improving the movie experience for Blind movie goers.

Subscribe to the podcast via Apple, Google Play, Sound Cloud, Stitcher, Tune In Radio

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:

What’s up RMMFamily!

It’s been a while since I felt the need to share some thoughts on my mind.

So here I go!

What you’re hearing is a scene from this year’s record breaking super hero movie from Marvel Studios, Black Panther.

I enjoy a super hero movie like everyone else , I’m just not one to get all fan boy about it before actually seeing the movie. I do enjoy the build up to the premier and the anticipation from those more passionate about the character and genre.

Black panther was a little different for me. It was pretty difficult to open my Twitter app and not read something about the movie. Whether television, radio or podcasts and all other media, Black Panther was a trending topic.

We planned to see the movie as a family either during the first week or soon thereafter. Unfortunately, my back problems forced us to alter our
plans.

Audio: “Doctor Says I need a backiotomy!” Dave Chappelle, “Half Baked”

Over the past few years, as Audio Description has increasingly been included in major movie releases (at least most that I’ve been interested in seeing) I find myself assuming that movies will be accessible for me.

Rather than questioning if it’s going to be included, Marvel’s Black Panther led me to be more concerned with the quality of the Audio Description or AD. To some extent we can probably consider that progress. However, improving the quality is a major part of moving to an experience closer to that of a sighted movie viewer.

My issues with Black Panther’s Audio Description begin with their choice of narrator and those scenes and elements included in the description. I propose we should think about description outside of the limitations set forward by movie’s start and end time.

The AD included in Black Panther was in my opinion lacking from the beginning.

One of the reasons I was excited to see this movie is because of the predominantly Black cast. The movie mostly takes place in the fictional African nation of Wakonda. This relatively small nation appearing to the outside world to be underdeveloped was actually the most technically advanced nation on the planet. Home to vibranium which absorbs sound waves and other vibrations, including kinetic energy making it the strongest metal.

Now, yes, this is a fictional movie, but for African Americans it represented the chance to see characters that display the people and culture in a positive light on screen. Finally getting a break from the roles of thugs, domestic, the white persons best friend who’s only existence appears to be to aid the friend and the sassy Black woman. And when it comes to movies taking place in the future – we’re more than often just written out completely.

Hollywood just has a problem with representation in general outside of your able bodied white male.

For many Black Panther lived up to the hype and fulfilled the void of not seeing positive representations of people of African descent. The vibe of this movie was unapologetically Black.

For those of us watching with Audio Description, well the vibe wasn’t the same. Trying to remain in the dream nation of Wakanda was impossible when we’re being shaken awake by the narrator who by all accounts was a British White man.

Does this mean, white people shouldn’t be allowed to narrate movies with predominantly Black casts? It’s really probably more like the reverse, should narrators of color be able to narrate stories outside of their culture. Of course.

However, when the movie is so deeply associated with a culture – I think it makes sense to extend that to the audio description.

Concise and informative description is even more imperative in fictional movies such as Black Panther. Often, the technology, architecture and possibly fashion is unique to the fictional location.

So much of these things were left out of the movie, forcing blind viewers to ask for input from others. For example, the description of the city itself being described something like a mix between modern and ancient… My view of ancient or modern may be different from another person’s. It seems too subjective.
In fact, someone who has never seen modern may not get much imagery at all from that statement.

There were several other things that I learned of only from having conversations with friends and family following the movie. Some of these things I thought really helped tell the story of the people and culture of Wakanda hence the story of Black Panther.

Now maybe this seems weird to you, but I was annoyed that a decision was made to not read the credits. This is especially relevant in a Marvel movie. Those familiar with these movies know not to leave until the credits are done because Marvel includes a scene or two that’s relevant to the telling of the next story in the series – somewhat of a preview or sneak peek. I personally enjoy hearing the names of the actors in the cast and sometimes enjoy hearing the many names of those involved in the production. Without this access I’m forced to ask who ever I’m with to read or look for a certain cast member. That usually feels like too much to ask someone.

— Close —

Looking at movie making as a process you can sort of neatly put things into categories or phases.

This includes everything from the idea to the creation including pre production to post production. Writing, casting, filming, editing and distribution.

Right now the Audio Description as far as I can tell takes place right before that last distribution phase.

Movie studios contract with companies specializing in Audio Description. Many of these companies also specialize in closed captioning as well and possibly language translations.

When we talk about access to technology; software, hardware, apps & websites the goal is access from the design phase. Shouldn’t we want the same from Audio Description?

Movies, televisions programs, documentaries, theater plays..any visual medium are really works of art. Someone has a vision. With movies and television , it’s the Director who is in charge of what the consumer sees. He/She is setting up and or approving camera placement, lighting and everything involved with the final images. They’re telling the story. That’s what the consumer sees.

Audio Description being written by a third party is now including a new vision. One that to my knowledge doesn’t include any real consultation with the Director.

There are certain scenes that are designed and purposely shot in a specific way to evoke an emotion, convey some sort of meaning.

With the limitations currently in place in creating an Audio description track for a movie, most notably making use of the silent time in between the dialog, things are going to get left out. The choices made by the AD production companies may not be the same as those of the Director.

Are we really limited to just the hour and a half or two hours from the movie’s start to end?

I’ve attended live plays which begin the description early.

Blind users were invited to the theater 45 minutes to an hour earlier than the general audience. This gave us time in some instances to explore the stage and set, costumers and even become familiar with the voices of the different actors.

Currently, Audio Description doesn’t begin until the movie starts. It seems like a track could be created and either streamed prior to the movie and even be made available for listening before arriving to the theater. In the case of Black Panther a more comprehensive description of the country could have been written including their technology and more without spoiling the movie.

It could also help to have some audio streaming through the device to assure its working before the movie begins. All too often when going to a movie with my wife, as the movie began I would realize there was no description coming through the headphones. My wife would run out of the theater to find a manager in order to get it fixed.

Going back to my comparison with access to technology, from an advocacy perspective many of us have written directly to developers of software, websites and apps. At the very least, these individuals become informed about the need for access. I often wonder if director’s, screen writers, producers and others in the early Pre production phase are aware of Audio Description.

In 2016 I had the opportunity to speak with Peter Middleton, one of the directors of a film featured on Reid My Mind Radio; Notes on Blindness. The film which is sort of a documentary with reenactments of actual events lip synced to the recordings of real audio captured by Theologian, John Hull using a cassette recorder. Mr. Hull kept very detailed recordings of his experience and thoughts as his vision faded beginning in 1983

There were multiple versions of the film released including one with Audio Description and the other with what they referred to as enhanced audio. This was an experiment of sorts that used additional dialog and more audio as queues to help viewers who are blind have a more inclusive experience of the film without the need for Audio Description or negatively impacting the experience for sighted viewers.

Creative people when facing a challenge step up and figure out ways to best communicate their vision.

From everything I’ve read and watched online about Ryan Coogler, the Director of Black Panther, I think he would have been the best person to write or at least lead the process of creating AD for the movie. He was involved in every aspect of this movie from choosing an African dialect from the South African region to use as the language spoken in the fictional country of Wakanda to the look and feel of their technical innovations.

Should consumers of AD be pushing for a change in where the description takes place in the movie life-cycle?

Should AD companies be teaming up with writers in an earlier phase along the production timeline?

Should movie writers strive to include more descriptive dialog that enables a blind movie goer to independently enjoy the movie?

Could directors and others like sound designers take blind movie goers into consideration and use a combination of all their tools to better improve the movie experience?

Could consumers have more control of their AD by using apps like Actiview (also profiled on Reid My Mind Radio) – helping to eliminate the problems of uninformed theater workers who are now responsible for making sure they give out and properly configure the right device.

I’m hoping those in the Audio Description field in combination with blind consumers, are thinking about these things that I believe will greatly improve the Audio Description experience.

I’m very appreciative of the improvements made to enable access across all media. I was a pretty big movie watcher before losing my sight and I really enjoy continuing this as part of my life. It helps maintain relationships, start new ones through conversations around a shared experience and if it’s a good movie, it allows for new thoughts or even escape and just good entertainment. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

On the subject of thought provoking content or entertainment, you should subscribe to this podcast hopefully for at least one of those things.

It’s easy to do using any podcast app. We’re on Apple Podcast, Google Play, Sound Cloud, Stitcher, Tune In Radio and you can always head over to ReidMyMind.com that’s R E I D, where you can listen, read the transcript and access episode resources.

I’m T.Reid and I thank you for listening!

Peace!

Hide the transcript

Reid My Mind Radio – The Reidwind Episode

Wednesday, April 26th, 2017

Sometimes it’s worth pausing to take a look at your work. Maybe a time to reflect, re-evaluate or maybe just slow down to pick some others up as you continue along the way.

Today we rewind, or rather Reidwind, and take a look back at some of the prior episodes in the past six months.

There’s lots of ways to consume this content… Sound Cloud, Apple Podcast and others, even transcript.

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:
For more than 2 years I have been producing this podcast.

The last 6 months or so include episodes that exemplify some of the reasons I enjoy doing this.

Today, let’s take a quick look back.

If you’re new here it’s a great way to introduce you to some of what Reid My Mind Radio is all about.

I say some because part of the stress and the joy of doing this is it’s mine… I can do whatever the Bleep I wanna do…

Like right now… I wanna drop my intro music!

[Audio Reid My Mind Theme Music…]

TR:
This podcast is a place for me to share opinions. Like…

After attending the Pennsylvania Council of the Blind conference; where people with vision loss are the main attendees, the environment is made very accessible. Unfortunately, outside of these types of experiences, this rarely occurs.

TR: From [” Are Blind Conferences Fantasy” Posted November 2, 2016](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-are-blind-conferences-fantasy/)
I recently heard these types of tours and activities or even the conferences themselves  described  as fantasy.
The idea is that this is not and will never be the real world. The real world I guess in the minds of those who believe this is fantasy will always  exclusively
cater only to those with sight and forever exclude people with vision loss.

At various times  throughout my journey with vision loss I came close to believing things can’t change. My struggle with cynicism was only made worse 
with the random encounters with those who remind me that they see me first as a blind man and their definition of that goes beyond my inability to see.
For them it’s the subconscious stereotypes and misperceptions that create their image of who I am. the things I do or don’t do are viewed through a lens
painted with layers of misinformation that so much of society has been lead to believe about blindness and disability.

TR:
Whenever possible, I like to include my daughters in my podcast.
I just enjoy their company,
when we hang out it’s always fun …
we laugh and act silly.
We share our sense of humor so it’s going to be fun.

In early December I tried to convince them
to do their own episode of the podcast as they did a few years ago, but
this time with a special twist.
From [“Join the Coalition” Posted December 31, 2017](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-join-the-coalition/)

[TReid in conversation with Raven]
Alright, I think we need to bring back Rizzle Razzle this year…

Raven:
I agree!

TReid:
…but

Raven:
Oh no…

TReid:
… you should have a guest…

Raven:
Ooooh, who is this guest?

TReid:
… me, Daddy!

{After several seconds…}

Raven
No!

[Silence]
TReid:
Yeh, I know, you’re probably just as shocked as I am!

After about 30 minutes or so I let it go…

Maybe I went about this the wrong way.
Rizzle is the oldest, she’d be able to influence Razzle.
Even though she’s away at school, we speak everyday…
I’m ready for her call usually in the morning as she’s walking to class.
That’s when I decided, I’ll get her on my side and the show will be a go…

Here’s how that went down…
[Sound of Harp indicating going back in time.]
[Sound of iPhone ringing]
TReid:
You know, why drag it out?

Riana: “No!”

[Jay Z, What more can I say…]

TR:
They came around and we
closed the year with the [Rizzle Razzle episode](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-rizzle-razzle-year-end-special/)
Even though they sabotage my microphone!

*This episode did not include transcripts as it was very much dependent on the music being discussed.

TR:
Reid My Mind is more than personal …
it’s about telling people’s stories…

People adjusting to blindness like
Robert Ott who drew from his martial arts background to move forward after losing his sight to a gun shot womb.

RO:
I couldn’t believe this was happening to me. Everything was racing through my mind. I’ve got pictures of me doing dive rolls over large groups of people and doing splits in the air. I used to go running a lot on the beach and hand springs and just all kinds of beautiful great stuff. I was so weak I couldn’t even do a push-up and now I’m blind. I can’t get around, my independence, my confidence, my self-esteem, my balance.

TR:
While these stories are specific to adjusting to blindness,
it’s easy to see how everyone has their own way of responding.

Maria Johnson, AKA Girl Gone Blind , decided to share her experiences and challenges on her own blog. …
She spoke very candidly of her adjustment process.
One memorable moment was some of her personal words of encouragement that led to a little creativity …

In [“Who is Girl gone Blind”](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-who-is-girl-gone-blind/) I included a “song” created using Maria’s words specifically “I got this”.

TR:
I don’t like to use the often referred to idea of
overcoming blindness or disability and accomplishing goals.
I like to think of working with what you have …
making the most out of your situation and counting your blessings…
Like young Ant, the first female blind rapper
From [“Meet Young Ant, First Female Blind Rapper”](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-meet-young-ant-first-female-rapper-whos-blind/)

TReid:
Young Ant in the building!

YA:
Young Ant in the building!

Treid:
Uh Oh!

So the way I look at this; Antynette is the person, Young Ant is the rapper!

YA:
[Laugh!] Yeah, that’s right!

TReid:
Alright, so first who is Antynette?

YA:
Antynette is a young lady who has been through a lot in a little bit over a year and half and is trying to find her through it with adjusting and coping
and in different techniques that I’m learning and trying to find different avenues of expressing how I’m feeling.

[Intro to “Count your Blessings” by Young Ant]

TReid:
Beautiful!
I lost my sight about 13 years ago. And so…

YA:
Really!

TReid:
Yeh so one of the things that I like to hear from people adjusting to blindness is that they don’t first start with who they are with the fact that they
are blind. You said you are a young lady!
Now, tell me who’s Young Ant?

YA:
Well Young Ant is a motivational rapper!

TR:
And then some like Doctor Dre best known for Yo MTV Raps and more, who’s adjustment process is about Fighting Back…

From[“Doctor Dre’s The Fight Back”](https://t.co/CzpxqDcUXg)

Dre:
I embrace it. And in embracing it he has put me on a path  to help other people and to reach out and express myself not  just about the type 2 Diabetes
not only about the blindness but  about when something goes on and there’s a struggle sometimes embrace your struggle to find your solutions.
It doesn’t mean it’s a guarantee for a cure or a guarantee to a perfect answer  but what it does is says you know what  I’m more than what’s going on with
me.
I can also work with this.

If you have a good relationship with your family, friends and  other people and reaching out. I learn every day from so many different people  and I pay
attention and I  try to pass on some of the knowledge of what I get  so that people can help themselves

TR:
It’s more than the adjustment experience.

We heard from
Robert Lewis sharing his story of
growing up in a segregated school for blind students.

From [“At The Intersection of Black & Blind”](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-at-the-intersection-of-black-and-blind/)

RL:
We went to one restaurant and the lady said you got to eat as fast as you can so we can get you out of here before the owner comes  back because if he
saw we had Black people here he would fire me!

TR:
In North Carolina, it was more than getting a meal.

RL:
Guys jumped out of the car and came over and they were going to beat us
all up.
We had no idea … What is this all about? Is it because we are blind; no, it’s  because you’re black and you’re blind!

TR:
Naru Kwinah and Leroy Moore, the two gentlemen producing the
documentary of the life of Joe Capers. Played a big role in artists like EnVogue, Tony Tony Tony and MC Hammer

From [“Who is Joe Capers”](http://reidmymind.com/reid-my-mind-radio-who-is-joe-capers/)

Naru:
Listen brother! His studio was called “J-Jams Studio: Joe did everything.  He had his mix board in Braille. He recorded, he engineered he mixed, he produced.
He did everything that you could every possibly do in the studio. And he had the greatest ear I have ever been around and I’ve  been doing music over 40
years of my life. If you had one note or one little thing off he knew and he would call you on it. You know because he was blind you thought you’d  get
away with stuff.

TR:
In that same episode we learn about Krip Hop from founder Leroy moore.

LM:

This year is our 10th Anniversary and we have loose chapters…

TR:
These include countries within Africa, the UK, Germany and Spain.

[Audio: “Tales of the Krip-Hop”, Rob da Noize Temple]

With the network formed by Leroy and co-founder Keith Jones, the two being disabled activists, the focus continues to be on education and advocacy.

LM:
So we saw Krip-Hop as a way to bring awareness around the history of disabled musicians from the Blues to Hip-Hop and really educate and to push the Hip-Hop
arena  around Ableism thinking around disability and to really say that disabled musicians have been here since the Blues.

TR:
That’s just a taste of some of what has appeared here on
Reid My Mind Radio over the past few months.

Subscribe now to make sure you are riding along during
the months to come.

You can subscribe via Apple Podcast or where ever you like to get your podcast content. That includes Stitcher and Tune In Radio.

Go check that out now, there’s lots of good stuff.

If you’re listening on Sound Cloud, hit that follow button.

I’m Thomas Reid
[Audio: Young Ant “Don’t get it wrong, I’m in my zone”]

[Audio: Reid My Mind theme music outro]
Peace

Hide the transcript

2016 Oscars Audio Description Included?

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

This past Sunday February 28 I tuned into the 88th Academy Awards to hear how Chris Rock handled the so called controversy. If you’re not familiar, with several movies this year featuring African American actors delivering what many would describe as Oscar worthy performances, for the second year in a row not a single African American or to my knowledge any person of color was nominated for an Oscar. Jada Pinkett Smith, actor and wife to Will Smith who delivered one of those performances, decided to call for a boycott. Now I know many are thinking, “Yo T, how the hell does that relate to audio description? Hang on, I’ll get there!

Chris Rock who was scheduled to host the Oscars prior to the call for a boycott was urged by some to quit. I didn’t agree with that. In fact, if we had some sort of “Black Council” formed to deal with such matters, and I was appointing the person to address the issue in the role of host, I honestly can’t think of another entertainer who could do a better job. Chris hits hard, no apologies, but does it in a way that is funny and entertaining to most. He can administer the medicine which may be hard to swallow for some, but it goes down. And everybody’s getting some medicine!

His opening monolog put the issue into perspective while the simple summary captured the goal of the ultimate desire prompting a boycott “…we want opportunity. We want black actors to get the same opportunities as white actors.”

Following Chris’ monolog I was half listening to the list of nominees in the first category; when I noticed the voice of one of the presenters providing audio description for the nominated scene. I stopped browsing the web and listened carefully. Unfortunately, by that time, the winner was announced and I didn’t even hear which category. I thought to myself, “Wow, do they actually have a category for best description?” I went back to the web. A few minutes later, once again I hear what sounds like audio description. This time coming from no other than Russell Crow. I know that voice, that’s Gladiator, I can tell you details about the day I saw that movie – if you have a lot of time to spare!

So by this time, I was getting excited. Yes, I get pretty happy when there’s an effort made to include access for me and others with vision loss. I’m a fan of movies and now I almost only watch a movie if it includes audio description.

If it weren’t for the Oscar’s lack of diversity as in #OscarsSoWhite, I wouldn’t have heard about the inclusion of description. I’m pretty in tuned to the blindness community and things related. Shouldn’t I have heard that the Academy Awards were offering audio description?

I sat up, grabbed my digital recorder in anticipation of the next category. I’m going to express my gratitude, I thought. I want to publicly congratulate the Academy for including me, including us! The next category is announced and I hit record…, nothing! No description. “Ok, that makes sense, “I think to myself, “way too much dialog in the scene to include description.”

Fast forward through the next few categories…, nothing!

“Ouie, What’s up with that…!” – Keenan Thompson, Saturday Night Live

So was I the only person hearing voices that night?

Nope. From the clip above someone else heard it.

 

2016 Oscars Audio Description, What happened?

  • You missed the other categories including description (0%, 0 Votes)
  • The description included was only applicable to the first two award categories. (0%, 0 Votes)
  • This was a test for some future project. (0%, 0 Votes)
  • It was a tease! (0%, 0 Votes)
  • You are hallucinating. (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 0

Loading ... Loading ...

As with every under represented group of people…”We just want to be included”

I Want To Believe

Wednesday, January 27th, 2016

I was planning to write a post on the return of one of my favorite shows, the X-Files. My idea was to either write a post or record an episode of Reid My Mind Radio on the experience. As the days moved closer to this past Sunday January 24 which was the premiere of the new revival, I reflected on how I used to enjoy this television show through most of its time on the air.

When the 6 episode series was announced I was excited but automatically reserved my excitement until I could determine if audio description would be included enabling me to fully enjoy and understand the story line. X-files like other shows rely a lot on scenery, facial expressions, visual clues and more. While my wife and I enjoy watching this together as we did years ago, I prefer not to rely on her or anyone for the descriptive information. Well, anyone other than the narrator providing the professionally produced audio description. It’s not that I don’t appreciate the effort; I just don’t want to feel as though I am stopping anyone from fully enjoying their own experience.

Once I confirmed that Fox would include audio description I allowed my excitement to take over. I have watched other   broadcasts of audio described content on my home television. Most recently my family and I watched the live performance of the Wiz in December on NBC.

After waiting for the NFC Championship game coverage to finally wrap up, my wife and I were extremely disappointed when it was clear that the audio described track was not being transmitted via my local cable provider.

My original assumption was that the Fox affiliate, FOX-56 WOLF – Hazleton, PA, carried by Blue Ridge Cable, my provider, was not in the top 60 markets. As per the regulation stated by the Federal Communications Commission:

“FCC rules require local TV station affiliates of ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC located in the top 60 TV markets (see list below) to provide 50 hours per calendar quarter (about 4 hours per week) of video-described prime time and/or children’s programming. “

Any thought as to who ranks 55? Yep, Hazleton, PA which means FOX 56-WOLF is required to pass the audio description track via SAP.

I contacted Blue Ridge to determine what can be done to resolve the problem. My issue has been elevated to the next level support and I am waiting for a response. My hope is that they will be able to resolve the issue. Otherwise I may have to contact WOLF – and let’s hope this one isn’t big or bad!

The title of this post, “I want to believe,” is borrowed from the X-Files. While this refers to UFO’s and other paranormal activity, I simply want to believe that a time will come when I don’t have to always be concerned about accessibility. In this case it’s access to the non-spoken content of a television show. Last week the accessibility challenge presented itself in a work related application requiring a CAPTCHA – the graphic that contains a picture of some letters that had to be entered in order to continue with a specific process.

I want to believe that tomorrow, I will just have access! And next week I will enjoy the X-Files with audio description.

**UPDATE*

I received a call from the support representative – there was a technical issue with a receiver… the problem seems to be resolved. I’ll report back after next Monday’s episode!

Reid My Mind Radio – Fitness For All

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

You know that feeling when you hear of an idea or new business and wonder to yourself, “Why didn’t I think of that?” In this interview for Gatewave Radio, I feature Mel Scott of Blind Alive who started exercise programs that can be done “eyes free.” Listen below and then head over to Blind Alive and sign up for a free demo.