Because We Are Captivating

October 9th, 2019  / Author: T.Reid

A professional headshot of Stephanae's smashing asymmetrical hairstyle with burgundy highlights. The muted Coral Cutie lipstick topped with a peach colored gloss provides a nice contrast against the gray backdrop. She is wearing a black dress and black tuxedo jacket trimmed in faux leather, silver statement necklace, and silver drop earrings.
Third time on the podcast, Stephanae McCoy is the co-founder of Captivating, an online magazine. Hear her journey from once believeing there was no future to empowering women with vision loss to see their Bold, Blind Beauty Captivating selves!
How did she start the magazine? What helped her find her purpose? And what’s her advice for others adjusting to vision loss? Plus Steph is a part of SPARK Saturday. #SparkSaturdayPCB)

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TR:

Welcome back to Reid My Mind Radio!

With each episode, I’m hopeful that we’re reaching someone new to vision loss. I know they are out there and I have a pretty good idea of what they’re experieencing. Mainly because I myself became Blind as an adult.

My name is Thomas Reid and I am host and producer of this hear podcast – which is all about sharing the stories of compelling people who themselves have some degree of blindness. From low vision to totally blind, like me!

In sharing our stories we begin to shatter the false beliefs and information about what it means to live with low vision, blindness or disability. Beliefs we may have never even realized we held. Notice I said we? Meaning you and I both. No one is immune.

For those interested in a different way of thinking,let’s go!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Yeah so you know how this works, this is your third time! (Laughs) Trifecta!

SM:

Laughing

My name is Stephanae McCoy and I am the founder of Bold Blind Beauty and online community with the purpose of empowering Blind and Visually Impaired women while connecting sighted and non sighted people. And I’m also the Co-Founder of Captivating.

TR:

That’s right, Steph is back on the podcast. I encourage you to check out her first and second episodes which I’ll link to from this episodes blog post over at ReidMyMind.com.

Today, let’s start with her most recent venture.

SM:

Captivating!

TR:

An online digital lifestyle magazine gearred to people with disabilities.

After witnessing the results of a friend and fellow Blind blogger’s make over, Steph reached out to the image consultant who performed the transformation.

SM:

Her name is Chelsea Nguyen. our first telephone conversation actually lasted three hours, the first time I met her. And we were just going on and on about the things we had in common.

TR:

But there are also differences.

SM:

Chelsea is not Blind. Chelsea does not have a disability, but Chelsea has a heart for people who do. And she specifically has a heart for people who are Blind and Visually Impaired. Being that she has had that experience working with Blind people she developed strategies to help Blind and visually Impaired people use non-visual techniques for applying makeup, taking care of their appearance and everything. She developped these things. I’m like we really gotta do something together.

TR:

Eventually the ideas turned into Captivating.

SM:

We were thinking about how people with disabilities are viewed broadly, especially if you have a visible disability. People stare at us a lot when we’re out here living our lives when we have a white cane or wheelchair or whatever.

TR:

Maybe that’s the gaze of seeing something unfamiliar, possibly fear or even ableism.

Whatever it is, Steph’s flipping it!

SM:

We think that when people are looking at us when we’re out here with our devices, that they’re looking at us because we are captivating.

TR:

That’s not her initial reaction to her vision loss in 2005. This attitude has it’s beginnings in 2009.

SM:

That’s when I was diagnosed legally Blind and had to look at some adaptations for work and life.

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Let’s say we’re back in 2009. Ok, so I remember how I felt in terms of my career and my future. Do you remember that time for you?

SM:

Oh my God yeah!

I had these plans. I had just gotten married like a year or so before. We had bought a house. I had just gotten a promotion at work and I just had all of these grand plans and it’s like now I’m legally Blind and now what

[TR in conversation with SM:]

Hmm.

SM:

You know?

[TR in conversation with SM:]
Yeah!

SM:

Before I connected with other organizations and other Blind people I just sort of thought that I had no future. I thought it was over.

TR:

TR:

That’s despair. An unforgettable emotion. She didn’t know it at the time, but she did have a way to take her from no future to Bold Blind Beauty to straight up Captivating?

SM:

even in the worst set of circumstances I would always think, there is always a way.

I didn’t know what that was going to look like but I knew there was going to be away that I could progress through this and I could adapt to it and grow with it. I didn’t think so at the time.

TR:

In the midst of pain, its hard to see how it can provide opportunity.

SM:

It wasn’t until I think I lost my sight and had to advocate on behalf of myself that it became clear to me what my real purpose was.

TR:

Steph’s earliest advocacy was as a mom.

SM:

My middle son had ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. When he was going to school because his behavior was so over the top, it was just very, very challenging trying to manage him especially being a single parent with two other children. I had to become my sons advocate. I didn’t even consider myself an advocate before he got diagnosed.

TR:

All set to discuss her son’s Individual Education Planwith a teacher and principal, Steph quickly realized she was unprepared when the attendees included several faculty and specialists.

SM:

That never happened again because after that I educated myself and I found out everything I need to know to be able to help my son and to be his advocate. Every time they would try to do something that I felt wasn’t Kosher, we would have to sit down and have a conversation. It was almost like a full time job.

TR:

Then there was advocacy from her perspective as a daughter.

SM:

My mother developed a disability in her later years. Her entire body was pulled to the left side so her head was almost touching the floor because of her Dystonia. She had reached a point where she was denied Social Security Disability three times. When you’re applying for Disability it’s a difficult process, but its made even more difficult once you’re denied the third time.

TR:

First step!

SM:

I got really angry, but on my way home I thought about it, I gotta sit back, think this through, do some research and then I started writing.

TR:

Writing a letter detailing her mothers situation including pictures and an invitation to visit. Addressed to the Social Security Administration.

SM:

I CC’d all of my representatives, her doctor and her attorney. Arland Spector’s office got involved and within six weeks my mother was getting the benefits that she rightly deserved.

TR:

The strength to move through challenges can come from all of our individual experiences.

Hopeless to Thriving Blind

September 25th, 2019  / Author: T.Reid

Kristin Smedley on stage
When Kristin Smedley was told her first son was Blind the doctor said there was no hope. Hear about her journey which took her from a lack of information to writing Thriving Blind: Stories of Real People Succeeding Without Sight.

Hear what sparked her journey, lessons for others impacted by vision loss and how you can see her at a live event geared to those adjusting to Blindness.

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TR:

Welcome to another episode of Reid My Mind Radio.
A podcast made for those adjusting to any degree of vision loss – meaning low vision to total blindness. You know this includes family and other loved ones too, right? It’s not just for the individual personally experiencing the loss.

My name is Thomas Reid, host and producer of what I’d like to think is your favorite podcast. Well, I have to believe that in order to achieve that, right?

Today we’re looking at vision loss through the lens of a mom who’s children were born Blind. Exactly what did she think when she received the diagnosis? What changed her perspective?

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro

I am Kristin Smedley. Author of the new book Thriving Blind: Stories of Real people Succeeding Without Sight.

TR:

Kristin, spelled with two i’s is a mom of three.

KS:

Two of which are Blind due to a mutation in the CRB1 Gene causing leber’s Congenital amaurosis.

I started the work that I do because 19 years ago and 16 years ago professionals told me there was no hope for my sons.

[TR in conversation with KS:]
Isn’t that amazing though, they have the title of professional and they’re saying those types of things; no hope. I hear these stories so many times and in so many different ways and it always comes down to a lack of information on the side of the professionals.

KS:

In 2019 to still say there’s no hope; You know doctors are told to do no harm, it’s harmful to a family to tell them there’s no hope. They don’t know what to tell them. But it is lack of education and lack of information. That’s why platforms like yours are so incredibly important and I’m so grateful because getting the word out and getting the stories out in as many different ways and media as we can, really closes the gap on that information education issue.

TR:

Fortunately Kristin did gain access to that information, but it didn’t happen overnight.

KS:

All I knew about blindness was really nothing at all.

I knew of Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles as most of us do. When I was a kid growing up there was the show little house on the Prairie where the one sister went blind. I still remember the horrific episode. My family was just rocked watching that and that’s how we felt about blindness. And that still didn’t educate much about blindness. I had no information. I had no story or person to go to that they had the same thing and they were doing okay.

TR:

The fact that the entertainment industry really does have such a power to impact our perception is why representation matters.

I’m reminded of a quote:
“It ain’t where you’re from, it’s where you’re at.”

– It’s from one of the all-time greatest MC’s, Rakim.

Meaning, we all have a history but what are you doing right now, today.

The history?

prior to learning her first son Michael was blind, Kristin says she was living the perfect life. A large house, manicured lawn, SUV….

KS:

I had worked my whole life to achieve all my goals and they were all coming true.

[TR in conversation with KS:]
I know that you said you were an athlete.

KS:

Yeh!

[TR in conversation with KS:]
I look at specifically people who are athletes and I think they come to disability from a certain perspective and I wonder how you as an athlete kind of thought about disability. So when your son was blind did that make an impact from that perspective?

KS:

You know it’s so interesting and I so appreciate this conversation because nobody in all the interviews I’ve done nobody has asked me about this from an athlete’s perspective. And honestly I think that that was the biggest thing that was crushing for me because my whole life from the time I was maybe six years old had been athletics. I was on every field. I tried everything, it’s like it’s in my DNA. I still at almost 48 years old, three days a week I’m up at the park kicking a Soccer ball around. It just makes me happy and then I thought oh my God, he will never experience the incredibleness of team sports and what athletics can do for a person. That was the biggest crushing thing for me.

TR:
Audio: It ain’t where you’re from, It’s where you’re at!” from “I Know You Got Soul”, Eric B. & Rakim

Today, Kristin is in a much different place.

[TR in conversation with KS:]

You are scheduled to speak at the PCB Conference; Woo, woo! (Laughs…)

KS:
(Laughs) I’m excited!

TR:

And so is PCB.

Specifically, Kristin is a part of the SPARK Saturday lineup. This event is geared to teens, adults, & parents of Children with Blindness or Vision Loss!! It’s a means of helping anyone impacted by vision loss with finding self-confidence, peer support, , Resources, & Knowledge

I asked Kristin to summarize her message to the different audience groups.

First, other parents of Blind children. This includes both those like Kristin who’s children were born blind and those whose children lose their sight later.

KS:

Regardless of what the journey is, I know that it is hard to say okay let’s get all the tools and resources that they need. let’s let them figure out what it is that they’re hopes and dreams are going to be because a lot of the kids come crashing down to because their hopes and dreams they had for their lives have to change.

If you at least face it to the point that let’s get the tools that they need so that they can still manage at school and do well and have a level playing field. Then let’s take a look at okay how do we need to shift their dreams and the things that they want to work on

TR:

the circumstances are specific to parents and children but the idea of accessing the right tools and eventually re-evaluating goals is relevant to us all.

Also important, attitude.

KS:

If your child is seeing you in devastation then there’s a devastation they take on also, so you got to do everything you can even though it is so hard.

If you’re honest with the kids and you’re on the journey with them and you’re their number one fan and their number one advocate and you also realize that friends are going to turn away, and the friends come back, the really good ones come back, it’s all steps in the journey. But if you can stay with them, get them every single tool and resource they need and let go of some of those hopes and dreams for a while and then tweak them you’ll get there faster and a little easier.

TR:

Addressing that second audience group, adults including spouses adjusting to vision loss, Kristin gives an example from Thriving Blind: Stories of Real people Succeeding Without Sight, her new book and resource to help ease the journey of adjusting to vision loss.

KS:

I always say this, I can never put myself in their shoes because that didn’t happen to me. But I will turn them on to Chris Downey. He was an extremely successful architect, fully sighted. At 45 I believe he had something health wise happen. They nicked his optic nerve and woke up completely blind. He was like everybody gave up and said that his life was over but he had a 10 year old son. His son at that point tried to get on a travel baseball team and didn’t make it and he kept talking to him about that you got to pivot and work and get over it and all that when things change. He said how could I give my son all that advice all these years and now I’m just going to sit here and sulk. Within a month of waking up completely blind he was back to work as an architect and he’s more in demand now then he was as a sighted architect.

[TR in conversation with KS:]

What about a general audience who’s not that familiar with blindness but yet they are interested in experiences other than their own?

KS:

I talk about the 70 percent unemployment rate, only 30 percent of Blind kids are graduating High School and 14 percent of college. It actually has nothing to do with blindness. It’s the general public and access to resources that’s the problem.

The fact that major companies are having to go into law suits to make their web sites accessible for Blind people in this day and age is uncanny to me!

When you back up the problem is perception. Most people perceive blindness to be completely devastating and horrific and they don’t even want to consider it because it’s so awful. My whole Facebook is about all the goofy silly regular things that my kids do alongside the extraordinary things that they do.

The general public’s perception needs to shift. People still thrive if they have sight or not.

TR:

That’s a long way from the images she once saw on Little House on the Prairie. So how exactly did she get to this idea of Thriving Blind?

First, while pregnant with her second son Mitchell, she was still learning to accept that her 3 year old Michael was blind. On this one particular day she found herself, I guess you can say bargaining.

KS:

I said to God, Dude you’ve known me for all these years. You know that will break me. You and I both know that I don’t have it in me to do this twice so let’s just call it a deal right here. And this one’s going to be sighted and Michael will be fine.

TR:

In the movies, this is where something far out of the ordinary happens. But in real life the signs tend to be right in front of our face.

KS:

Then Michael bounced into my room like he did every day. Every day of his life he was bouncing and smiling and singing so it was no different that morning.

TR:

The difference, Kristin was in the right place to recognize the message Then, little 3 year old Michael said:

KS:

Isn’t this the best day ever!

The sun is up and I’m playing with all my toys and gosh I’m just so happy!

And then it was like a lightning bolt… I’m looking at him bounce right down the hallway and I thought this kid couldn’t care less about the challenges he’s facing. He didn’t see them as challenges. He figured out to that point everything he needed to do with a smile on his face at all times and that’s when I said alright you know if you’re going to do this to me twice then you’re going to have to send me every person, every resource because we both know I can’t do this alone. And from that moment on it was like weekly, daily I swear now it’s hourly by the minute a new person comes into my journey, a resource comes across my email. It is nonstop.

TR:

Meeting the people and learning of resources led Kristin to an understanding.

KS:

Who am I to sit on all that information and not turn around and share it because people were constantly calling me and messaging me saying how did you do it?

TR:

her answer to that question is the book Thriving Blind. One of her goals;

KS:

I want every specialist to hand that to a mom that was like me, nowhere to turn, never met a Blind person before had no idea of the possibility and put that in her hand. It’s the resource that I never had. The optimism that nobody could hand me; that’s what Thriving Blind is.

TR:

This shouldn’t be news to anyone but a change in attitude doesn’t fix everything. For example, while her children are all indeed thriving; Kristin says the feelings return.

But now she has a new way of handling them.

KS:

I sit in those feelings. What is it all about? And then realize it’s fear of the unknown.

I’m definitely not without moments of slipping into that pit again. I just have a way better system now to get me out of it.

TR:

An extremely honest and important reality for anyone in the midst of an adjustment to
understand.

KS:

I beat myself up a long time over those first three years of sitting and crying on my couch. I think you’re exactly right now that I think about it. Gosh, my heart is exploding because maybe the thing is I had to be so devastated that I had nowhere else to go and that’s why I had that moment of surrender the way I did.

[TR in conversation with KS:]

Again, always thinking about the person adjusting to vision loss, that’s what I’m doing, I remember my experience like you just said beating yourself up. I remember kind of beating myself up but it was like nah you are making progress but it was hard to see it. I guess I just always want people to know who are in that process that, nah, keep walking that journey because you’re going to get through. You got to keep moving forward in order to get through it.

TR:

A change in perception, a chance to meet others who have successfully walked a similar journey, access to resources; all ingredients to Thriving Blind.

Similarly, this is what you’ll get at SPARK Saturday where You’ll hear from Kristin Smedley herself along with Founder of Bold Blind Beauty and Co-Founder of Captivating Magazine, Stephanae McCoy, Dr. Andre Watson and yours truly kicking it off on October 19, 2019.

You can find links to this event on this episodes blog post at ReidMyMind.com. I’ll also link you to Kristin Smedley.com, , her TED Talk and of course Thriving Blind: Stories of Real people Succeeding Without Sight.

KS:

Paperback and Kindle versions available on Amazon with the audio version coming soon. And the electronic Braille format, the BRF file is available at KristinSmedley.com thanks to an incredible donation from the CEO of T-Mobile, it’s available at the same price of the Kindle version, $9.99. We’re working on the printed Braille version. That’s been an interesting journey, getting printed Braille in this country.

[TR in conversation with KS:]

Are you reading the audio book?

KS:

So the big surprise is that I’m reading it but my son Michael is doing all of the male interviews. He’s reading theirs.

# Close

TR:

Shout out to Kristin and her kids, Michael, Mitchell and her daughter Karissa.

KS:

Michael’s the oldest, but Mitchell would probably want me to point out that Mitchell’s taller than Michael.

[TR in conversation with KS:]

I love it when the youngest is taller than the oldest one. I’m a younger child.

KS:

Well I’m sure that my daughter would probably want me to point out that she’s the youngest but she’s the tallest.

[TR in conversation with KS:]
Oh, look at that. Okay, go head girl!

TR & KS laugh…

TR:

And if you haven’t yet, you should really go ahead and subscribe to this podcast wherever you like to listen. Apple, Spotify, Google or your favorite app.

You can always visit www.ReidMyMind.com, that’s R to the E I D like my last name!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

Peace!

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Sparking Success After Vision Loss

September 11th, 2019  / Author: T.Reid

Blindness, Low Vision any degree of significant vision loss occurs for different reasons. It impacts people from all walks of life at various ages.
My guest today, Susan Lichtenfels, President of the Pennsylvania Council of the Blind (PCB) says; “None of our experiences are ever the same, but they’re similar.”

Looking at people adjusting to vision loss, it’s apparent there are also similarities in making that a success.

Hear all about SPARK Saturday, an event sponsored by the Pennsylvania Council of the Blind to light the fire in anyone impacted by vision loss. Plus a look at how PCB can help you attend.

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TR:

Welcome back to another episode of Reid My Mind Radio. My name is Thomas Reid. Not only am I producer & host of this podcast, but I’m the target audience, a person adjusting to becoming Blind as an adult.

While I’m no longer new to blindness, I do think I would have appreciated having a podcast like this one during those early years.

In some ways I did. I was fortunate to have other people with all degrees of vision loss in my life. People who are Blind, living productive lives on their terms.

We’re going to get into a bit of that and how it can be of help to you or someone you know right now adjusting to vision loss from low vision to total blindness.

First let me drop this on you like…

Audio from opening music (Wow!)

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro Music

TR:

Early on in my adjustment I became involved in advocacy. It began locally and grew to state and national after helping to form a chapter of the Pennsylvania Council of the Blind or PCB in my county.

Attending my very first PCB state Conference & convention made a big impact on my life. It gave me the chance to meet people who both indirectly and directly taught me a lot about blindness. It was extremely important to my personal adjustment.

Today we’re going to take a look at some of what PCB has to offer those adjusting to, experiencing or impacted by blindness or vision loss; including an event that many of you may want to attend. Plus opportunities to help you do that.

Allow me to present a friend of mine to help guide you on this tour.

SL:

My name is Sue Lichtenfels and I am currently the President of PCB. But when I’m not wearing that hat I am a wife, I am an Advocate and I am a person with a disability, actually 2 disabilities. I am a mother of a soon to be 8 year old.

[TR in conversation with SL:]

8 years old already. Wow, I’ve known you for a while Sue.

Sl:

We started on the board at the same time. In 2007 we were elected and we started serving in 2008.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
And how long were you in PCB ?

Sl:

I only joined in 2005. We really are like right around the same… (laughs)

[TR in conversation with SL:]
Yeh! So was your first conference 2006 or 2005?

Sl:

My first conference as a member was 06.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
Yen, same with me!

TR:

We’re going to start with advocacy, but let me first be an advocate for this podcast.

Sue has agreed to come back on the podcast to share more of her story.

SL:

We’ll sit down and do another interview.

TR:

I’m just saying! It’s on the record now!

Self-advocacy is often a gateway to becoming an advocate for other. For Sue, it started in college.

SL:

No one’s there anymore to kind of be a buffer between you and your professors or the learning center that’s helping to adapt your materials in the format you can use.

#Goal Ball

TR:

While at the University of Pittsburg, Sue was introduced to the sport of Goal Ball which truly made an impression on her.

SL:

It’s a sport with three players on each team played on an indoor court and you kind of roll a ball the size of a basketball. It’s got bells in it and you roll it in a bowling motion and then you slide and use your body to block the ball from going beyond your team into the goal.

TR:

It may sound like just a game, but Sue grew up loving sports and always wanting to play and compete.

SL:

I was never allowed to. So when I found this sport, Goal Ball, I really , really loved it.

TR:

Sue became really good at the game. In fact, she played for the USA team in the World Championship in Canada.

SL:

And then I was in this car accident and lost the use of my legs.

TR:

This appears to be what really activated that inner advocate.

SL:

I had this opportunity to finally find a sport, find something I could be athletic and involved in so I wanted to do work and do advocacy get other kids that are mainstreamed the opportunity to be more involved in physical education and recreation.

TR:

Sue applied for and received a fellowship which enabled her to start a nonprofit.

SL:

Called Sports Vision, to create opportunities for children. I went out and spoke to Physical Education Teachers, IU teachers to advocate on behalf of getting children more involved in physical education.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
When you said that you weren’t allowed to was that a parental thing or was that a school thing where you weren’t allowed to participate in sports?

Sl:

I wasn’t allowed to participate in sports for fear that I would get hurt.

TR:

Children attending schools for the Blind had adaptive sports and recreational activities. Unfortunately, fear often caused children like Sue who were mainstreamed to be kept on the sidelines and excused from physical education and sports.

SL:

Fear was on the side of the parent who was afraid that their child was going to get hurt. The fear is also on the side of the district that doesn’t want to take a chance in getting sued because a child did get hurt.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
I got you, so it’s not like you had an advocate at school or at home kind of saying hey she wants to play sports, let her do it. So then you became that advocate in Sports Vision.

Sl:

Correct.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
Cool!

TR:

Also cool was when Sue brought her talent and persistence to the Pennsylvania Council of the Blind. Already familiar with running her own nonprofit and filling multiple roles, she took on many within the organization before her election to PCB President.

SL:

Fundraising, membership, awards, conference program and planning I’ve pretty much served on every committee or team within the organization.

Since 2010 I’ve been Editor of the PCB Advocate which is our quarterly newsletter. In 2007 I was elected to the board of PCB and been serving as a member of the board ever since.

# Challenges of Leading Membership Org.

Currently Sue is winding down the last months of her second and final term serving as PCB president.

Just the right time to ask her about the challenges of leading a member based advocacy organization.

First, challenges of the membership model itself.

SL:

Engagement.

When you’re a member based organization there is a micro way of thinking. You tend to gear your work towards the people that are in your organization. And we spend a lot of time offering ways to try and get our members more active when the reality of the situation is that our mission is to promote independence and opportunity for all who are Blind or visually impaired.

TR:

Second, advocacy

SL:

I think when many people hear the term advocacy they automatically associate it with legislative, policy those types of issues. They don’t recognize it for all the rest of the issues that need to be addressed that maybe aren’t necessarily achieved through writing a Legislator.

[TR in conversation with SL:]
Such as?

Sl:

Educating the public about the abilities of people that are Blind or visually impaired. The peer support that is necessary to take someone from not having any idea about what their own capabilities are and providing them with the ability to listen and offer them guidance.

That’s advocacy too.

TR:

So, how exactly does PCB offer support?

Here’s three ways.

Audio: One!

SL:

Peer discussion calls – these are organized usually around a specific topic. We have a conversation around issues such as travel when you’re Blind or visually impaired. We talk about our own experience , we share our stories and we provide a forum where we all learn from one another.

Audio: “Two!”

SL:

Peer Mentors – A lot of times the best way to cope with losing vision is to talk to someone who’s been there. None of our experiences are ever the same, but they’re similar.

TR:

Through their network which includes people who span all degrees of vision loss, from low vision to total blindness, PCB has something else to can offer…

SL:
Someone to talk to them on a one on one basis and provide them with guidance and advice and support.

Audio: “Three”

SL:
Local chapters – throughout the state we do have chapters who usually meet on a once a month basis and these are people who are blind or visually impaired who are more than willing and ready to welcome those who are new to vision loss and to really provide that connection and that one on one in person peer support.

TR:

While the local chapters are obviously specific to the state of Pennsylvania, “One and two” the discussion calls and peer mentors are all open to anyone experiencing vision loss.

SL:

Some of the specific advocacy discussions might be Pennsylvania specific but there’s a lot of information that we share that’s blindness and support related that isn’t geographically specific.

If you or someone you know is an individual who has vision loss and who’s vision loss has occurred within the last five years, I encourage you to apply for our Adjustment to Blindness First Timer Conference Scholarship.

TR:

This is a full scholarship! It covers your attendance for the weekend. That includes your registration, conference meals and activities, hotel…

SL:

And it will also cover ground transportation to and from the conference. To learn more about the scholarship, contact the PCB Office at 877617 – 7407 or send an email to Leadership@pcb1.org.

TR:

But that’s not it!

Maybe you’re thinking, Thomas, I’ve been Blind for more than 5 years and like you I believe the adjustment process is an ongoing thing and I really would love to attend. Are there any opportunities to help me get there!

Well, yes! PCB has some additional scholarships that you can check out on their web page at pcb1.org/conference

And then there’s also a $500 merit award available this year, specifically for those who are Blind or Visually Impaired and currently enrolled in a vocational or academic program.

SL:

Or some type of professional licensure.

We’re actually going to award three individuals stipends to attend the PCB Conference. So the top three finalists for the Merit Award will receive stipends to attend which will include the hotel, travel, conference registration and meals. Once folks get to the conference, those three individuals, we will announce who will win the grand prize of the $500 Merit Award.

TR:

That’s a great opportunity! I’d love to see it go to someone in the Reid My Mind Radio family.

Whether you, a family member or friend is adjusting to blindness or low vision; the PCB conference truly can be the experience that you need in your life right now.

SL:
But if you can’t make the entire weekend, and you can only pick one day to come and join us, I really encourage you not to miss our Saturday morning presentations. It’s going to be amazing!

TR:

It’s going to be hot!

It’s called SPARK Saturday because we’re bringing that heat!

[TR in conversation with SL:]

What about you? How has your involvement with PCB impacted you personally?

SL:

You know I’ve been involved at the leadership level and involved in the work of the organization for so long, I’ve gained so many skills. So I mean I’m a much more well-rounded person with regards to blindness skills but also skills that are work and project related.

TR:

The result of actually doing the work?

Sl:

I have a lot more confidence now in my abilities than I used to.

TR:

That confidence extends way pass the work.

Last year Sue decided to write and direct a play for PCB’s post banquet entertainment.

She cast it with her PCB peers.

SL:

It’s just such a fun time to rehearse with people. Really get to know people in that way where everyone is just kind of dropping their guard and letting you see the silliness, the fun. In the whole process of it such peer support we exchanged. I never would have had the confidence to do that. To write it and actually put it out there for people to kind of judge it. I wouldn’t have had the confidence to do that if I wasn’t a part of this organization.

TR:

Now, if you don’t mind, I’m going to get a bit nostalgic!

Audio: Can’t Stop Won’t Stop PCB

You see, for several years, I served as PCB Conference Coordinator. I used to circulate conference information via audio. It was called “The Blast”. One of the things I did was conclude with the conference details… it went something like;

The 2019 PCB Conference will take place in Harrisburg, PA at the Crown Plaza located on South Second Street – just two blocks from the Amtrak and Greyhound station. (I told you it’s going to be accessible!)

The PCB room rate is;
94 dollars per night which is for a room with a king size bed.

(For the aristocrats among us!)

102 dollars for a room with two queen size beds.

(For the money savers or the very friendly!)

The festivities begin on October 17 and last through October 20, 2019.

For all the details visit pcb1.org/conference
Or you can pop over to this episode’s blog post at ReidMyMind.com for all the links.

If you want to reach out to Sue, well she’s not on Twitter, yet! She is however on Facebook if you can spell her name correctly, Susan Lichtenfels.

Every time I speak with Sue it leaves me with such a warm fuzzy feeling! She’s always so kind and patient especially with me as I often ask things at least twice.

TR:

What’s the qualifications for that again?

SL:

Oh my God, you’re gonna get kicked in the face, I swear to God!

TR:

Laughs… I want you to just say it!
SL:

My legs may not work but I might just give you a kick in the face!
(The two laugh together!)

Audio: Can’t stop, won’t stop PCB Conference!…

Audio: Explosion … Blast!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

TR:
Peace!

Hide the transcript

Audio Description: More than Movies Television and Theater

August 28th, 2019  / Author: T.Reid

Most people familiar with Audio Description or Descriptive Video have probably experienced the art access through movies, television or live theater. Today we hear about other applications where the art form provides access.

Headshot of Kat Germain
Kat Germain, a Describer from Toronto Canada tells us about providing description during conferences, sporting events and more. Plus we hear how she is training future describers on more than narration and post production.

Listen

Resources

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:

What’s up family. Reid My Mind Radio family!

You know, we’re growing. That means, our message is spreading to more people. Slowly we’re changing what people think about blindness. With every episode we’re challenging the perceptions of what it means to be blind.

Unfortunately, some people think it means life is over. They no longer see the life as being filled with opportunity. I get it, remember I’ve been there and felt that. But today I can definitely tell you there’s lots of opportunity if you’re willing to see them as such.

If you’re listening that means you are. And I got you.

If you want to assist in getting this message out especially to those newly impacted by blindness, low vision disability; tell a friend, to tell a friend…

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Intro Music

TR:
today, we’re continuing with our look at the opportunities available through Audio Description. Both from the consumer perspective as in additional applications and production.

To do this, we’re going North.

KG:

My name is Kat Germain and I am an Audio Describer based in Toronto Canada.

[TR in conversation with KG:]
So let’s start with the definition of Audio Description as described on your website KatGermain.com. You mentioned talking pictorially.

KG:

We’re trying to use dynamic language. language that is descriptive , multi textured and vibrant. Painting a picture with words and filling in information in ways that is not going to distract from that which we’re describing but is going to add to it and help the understanding of the listener.

TR:

A multi textured vibrant painting with words.

That’s a cool definition of Audio Description or AD. If you’re a regular here you’re probably already familiar with AD.

I’m pretty confident however that you’re less familiar with description in the settings Kat tends to apply her artistic skills.

Like conferences and workshops.

KG:

If there’s a presenter they’ve got a Power point presentation, video clips associated with that, they’ve got photographs, whatever it is and my job is to describe those things to the listener. There’s also often a lot of signage around, people places, the size of the room, where the washrooms are all of those things to help the listener be as A., independent as they choose to be and then B., to give them information.

TR:

I know what you’re thinking. Wow, Canada. First health care and now this. Well it’s not yet as common as you may think.

KG:

I have sort of two or three people who are from the Blind partially sighted and low vision community and when they go to conferences they specifically ask for the accommodation of Audio Description and so I’m called for that. I have a close relationship with those people and so I know the kinds of things that they want and I also adjust it to what their needs are.

[ and so for example a lot of them are going to conferences where there’s a large number of people who are disability identified or parts of the conference are specifically geared towards or celebrating people with lived experience of disability or people who are working with those communities. And so they often want to know what people look like. If the person who is speaking about a lived experience actually potentially has a lived experience. And those kinds of questions are potentially a little bit politically incorrect. I wouldn’t announce that over a system with a large number of listeners but if it’s one person I’m always very happy to answer a question. And likewise even if it’s a lot of people after the show or the event or whatever it is if they want to ask me a question about perceived cultural background of a character or a person I’m happy to do that as well.
]

[TR in conversation with KG:]

So can you describe how it actually works because if you’re there for one person I’m sort of imagining that you’re sitting right next to the person but my understanding is that’s not the way you do it.

KG:

That’s not the way I do it but it is a possibility. Generally speaking I am a little further back and away from the crowd and mostly that has to do with so other people are not distracted by me speaking because while I’m trying not to speak on top of the words of the person whose presenting as best as I can because it’s going to be improvised, it still can be a little distracting for people that are around. So I separate myself from the group and I speak through a little microphone and then the person has a receiver that’s about the size of a fold up wallet and they listen through a single ear piece.

[TR in conversation with KG:]
So then in that case it’s a one way communication?

KG:

Correct.

[TR in conversation with KG:]

Ok. So those questions they would ask you later on. They wouldn’t necessarily get the opportunity to ask you right there unless they’re texting you.

KG:

Which as happened as well. Yes.

[TR in conversation with KG:]

Ah, ok!

TR:

While these accommodations are often for individuals, Kat requests that the service is advertised so others can also benefit. Just in case, she’s prepared with multiple receivers.

So is this available here in the states?

KG:

I’m not familiar with anybody who does conferences in the states but I am familiar with lots of Describers down there.

[TR in conversation with KG:]
Ok, so for our purposes if you do want it you have to call Kat Germain. How about that! Laughs…

KG:

Laughs… Yes that is exactly the rule.

TR:

I mean it makes sense! Not only does she have the experience, but there’s a knowledge of best practices for the describer. And, she also has great suggestions for presenters.

KG:

Accessibility doesn’t have to always be on the describer. We can be a little bit more interdependent and a little bit more inclusive. For example the presenters can talk a little bit about their video themselves. They can introduce themselves and what they’re wearing that day.

TR:

And what about group or panel discussions where multiple people are contributing.

Whether you are participating in the discussion or in the audience, from a blindness perspective, it can get tricky.

KG:

Often people who rely on visual cues can tell that somebody has sat back in their chair, they put their hands down and are looking around , there’s a visual cue that they’ve stopped speaking. But if you’re not accessing things visually, if you’re not accessing them in the same way visually then you don’t have that cue and so the person if they say that’s the end of my thought then the person knows ok maybe I can put up my hand now , I can say something, I can interject without interrupting them etc.

TR:

What are some of the other applications for Audio Description that you may have not experienced or considered.

KG:

I love my theater, I love my conferences, I love my Descriptive Video, but sports.

Audio: Play by Play from the NBA 2019 Championship … Toronto Raptors Win!

TR:

Yes, there’s the play by play, but have you ever wondered what you’re missing especially when attending a live game? Like when Kat described a game of Wheelchair Basketball.

KG:

I worked with a colleague and he has the sports commentary background and I have the Audio Description background. And we worked in tandem. The way that we presented what we were doing is a little bit more of a hybrid. We did do the straight up description, but then also we did a little bit more commentating as well; what does team Canada need to do to catch up? How is so and so playing in this game? We made that decision to do it that way and the people who listened enjoyed it.

TR:

I think what makes this exciting is how the description goes beyond the action on the court.

KG:

In more detail than you would hear for example on a radio broadcast. Additionally though, I was describing what was happening in the stadium. I was talking about the antics of the mascot and where the t-shirt cannon was pointing. What the half time dancers were doing and what the logos look like that were all around the stadium. What was happening on the Video-Tron because they had a bunch of gag things. A kiss camera where they put a heart around you and filmed you when you were about to kiss. A bongo camera where they super impost bongos in front of a person who was on screen and they had to move their hands up and down as if they were playing the bongos.

TR:

Now, I’m not the biggest sports fan, but I do enjoy the energy of a live game. So I was immediately interested when Kat mentioned that they’re looking into describing a baseball game.

KG:

I’m really hopeful we’re going to sometime in the near future get a baseball game. We’d ask the arena to offer us a box and then invite folks in the community to come and we’d do the description in the box with them there. I promise to invite you.

[TR in conversation with KG:]
Oh yeh, please do!

TR:

Just when you thought you knew what to expect from Audio Description. Someone pushes the boundary a bit further because they believe in access.

KG:

I’m doing a sketch show right now because I have a comedy background. I did the Second City Conservatory. I love comedy and want very, very much to support it and for the audience to get the jokes and hopefully get the jokes as close as possible to the same time as the rest of the audience.

TR:

AD in this particular application gives Kat a bit more room to use techniques that she would otherwise forgo.

KG:

I do feel to support the work and to support the people listening presumably who are there at the show because they want to laugh with everybody else that I felt like it was a little bit of nudge was needed for a couple of spaces. Not throughout the whole thing. For example there’s a witch scene. A witch does a spell and the lights and flicker. And there’s another one… flash and flicker and the third one, she does her spell and, …. nothing. So I can do a little bit of that inflection. A little bit of pause so it’s that comedic timing within the Audio Description itself without being comedic myself.

TR:

A sense of humor is important in live events, you never know what you may have to describe.

KG:

One of the men gets completely naked we had a long description of what the average size of a man’s…

Audio: Ahem, Ahem, Got Damn! “Let Me Clear My Throat”, DJ Cool

TR:

With such vast experience, Kat’s recently started her latest role in Audio Description; training future describers.

KG:

I’ve trained ten people to be Descriptive Video Specialists. It was a three day workshop and there is another one planned for the very near future

TR:

Kat couldn’t devote time to teaching voice work, so she sought students with a background in either acting or voice over. Additionally she wanted those interested in writing description.

KG:

Post production as well. Editing the voice recording, getting it all up to spec, mixing it etc. Sending it off to the broadcasters.

TR:

Creating AD is more than technical.

KG:

Identity is a huge topic here, particularly in Toronto. It’s my understanding that we have the most diverse city in the entire world. We have the most number of languages spoken here, the most number of countries represented here. It’s a thing!

TR:

It’s a thing that finally we’re talking more about.

Respecting cultural differences through inclusion and representation. From all perspectives including the consumer, and creators.

KG:

It’s a pretty challenging balance. What would fly in Toronto is not necessarily going to fly in a teeny tiny town on the northern east coast. [of Canada]

TR:

Similar to the U.S. Canada is trying to figure this out. Currently there aren’t any rules just some generic guidelines recommended by Accessible Media Inc.

KG:

Describing a person’s race or ethnicity or disability is not necessary unless its perceived to be relevant to a plot or character development.

To me the question is who’s doing the perceiving.

The majority of describers in Canada are generally speaking white people, probably sis gender. There is not a huge ton of diversity with the describers and I don’t think that matters in and of itself but I think it would be fantastic if we had a little bit more diversity. And certainly with my Descriptive Video students I actively went and sought out actors of color that I knew and thought might be interested.

TR:

While she follows the guidelines, she does have a particular point of view when it comes to diversity.

KG:

I feel that it’s always relevant who is and who is not represented on a stage or a screen. I work in inner city schools with a huge group of diverse kids and I want those kids to see themselves reflected on stages or screens. Or again, know that currently they are not. I want my students to have heroes and people to look up to and if they don’t know there’s a Blind person on a stage or a person who’s Japanese on stage then to me I feel it’s not doing them or the play a service.

TR:

During a recent live theater performance, one of the actors was Blind. In no way was this relevant to the role.

KG:

I had the chance to speak with the actor himself and he said yes he would like them to know that he’s on the stage and he’s Blind.

[TR in conversation with KG:]

how did you get into Audio Description from the jump? What made you interested in it?

KG:

Representation and equity and access has basically been a part of my life’s work. It started when I was two years old and I went with my Nana to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. They had a residence there. We would go shopping, grocery shopping for the residence. That was the environment I grew up in with a grandmother who’s very interested in volunteerism and working to support communities who are traditionally marginalized. Growing up in downtown Toronto we got all kinds of beautiful skin colors and hair textures and heights and shapes and everything. My friends and my family were not being represented on stages or screens in this extremely diverse city.

Which put a bee in my bonnet.

TR:

My apologies for that rough language!
[
Too often when we hear the term diversity, it doesn’t always include all marginalized groups.

KG:

Cultural heritage, physical, neuro, gender fluidity, so diversity in its full spectrum.

TR:
]
Eventually Kat began working with Picasso Pro. An organization providing training and workshops to artists with disabilities who were not being represented on stage.

KG:

They were the ones who applied for funding and got a grant to bring a woman up from California, Deb Lewis. She was the one person who essentially seeded Canada with Audio Description. She taught the group on the west coast in Vancouver, 8 of us in Toronto, and then there’s also Stratford Ontario and they have the Stratford Festival. Since then Steph, who is the woman on the west coast trained some other people around the country but it’s still only like four or five groups of us in Canada.

TR:

I asked Kat to identify some opportunities for Blind and Low Vision people to participate in the creation of Audio Description. She’s actually seeking funding to develop such a practice.

KG:

The easiest one would be straight up the narration part of Audio Description. I also feel that there is room for people if they are interested in doing the post production for Audio Description as well. They would edit the sound files and mix it and make sure it’s up to broadcast specs. Leading teams who are providing the service in sort of management positions as well.

TR:

Of course, there’s quality control consultants. Not only do they provide feedback on the actual description

KG:

Every time I’m hired to do a workshop I always bring a community consultant with me. I don’t feel like it’s appropriate for me to be teaching any skills about community when there’s no body from the community there. They’re going to know better what their needs are.

TR:

Not everyone involved with AD is familiar with people who are Blind and Low Vision. There’s a lot of power in personal interaction.

KG:

I also think probably it makes everything more immediate and more meaningful for the learners as well.

Kind of the concept of nothing about us without us.

TR:

That’s the perfect way to wrap up these last two episodes around Audio description

I challenge those in the business of AD and in fact, I’ll take this even further, any business that serves the disability community, if the community isn’t participating in that business in a non-consumer role, it’s time you ask yourself why. And it’s crucial you question any response that ultimately keeps a member of the community from doing so.

A big shout out to Kat Germain

[TR in conversation with KG:]

Now where can folks learn more about Kat Germain and what you do, your trainings and possibly contact you to get you to describe a conference?

KG:

Hint, hint! Or sports!

My website is www. KatGermain.com. That’s (spelled out) Kat Germain.com. There’s no E on the end of Germain.

TR:

She can be reached by email as well

KG:

At Kat @KatGermain.com

You can also contact me in Toronto as well. My area code is 647-292-3359.

TR:

Instagram and Twitter?

KG:

Kat_Germain

TR:

You can find links to Kat, transcripts to each episode and more on ReidMyMind.com

There’s only one way to make sure you don’t miss an episode…

Subscribe!
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You can always send me feedback or recommend a guest or topic all you have to do is hollaback!

We have the comments section on the blog, ReidMyMind.com.
The email; ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com
The Reid My Mind Radio Feedback Line where you can leave a voice mail: 1 570-798-7343

I would really love voice messages that I can share on the podcast. If you don’t want to call, you can grab your smart phone and record a voice memo and email the finished recording to ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com.

I’d love to hear and share the voices of those who are listening. If you want to send a message but don’t want it shared just say so and it’s all good.

I appreciate you listening and if you liked what you heard please rate and even review the show via Apple Podcast. And please, tell a friend to listen. Spread the love, man!

You can always visit www.ReidMyMind.com, that’s R to the E I D like my last name!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

Peace!

Hide the transcript

Opportunities in the Creation of Audio Description

August 21st, 2019  / Author: T.Reid

As we continue looking at Audio description, we take a look at the opportunities for those within the Blind and Low Vision community to participate in its creation and not just as consumers.

Headshot of Colleen Connor and Guide Dog Joplin
Colleen Connor, co-founder of Audio Training Retreats & an Audio Description Quality Control Consultant is doing exactly that. We explore the challenges and some potential solutions, current ways to get involved and things being done to support future involvement from more Blind people.

Listen

###Resources

Transcript

Show the transcript

TR:

What’s up Reid My Mind Radio Family.

I had to take a little break from the podcast. I’ll explain more about that in a future episode as its directly related both to this podcast and adjustment to blindness.

This episode is actually being posted on an off week. So that means expect to get another next week. In fact the two sort of support one another.

We’ll be moving forward with episodes every two weeks after that taking us through the end of the year, with a break beginning some time in December.
For now, let’s get it!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio IntroMusic

TR:

One question that I suppose is asked by just about anyone adjusting to becoming Blind as an adult, especially working age, is what sort of work can a Blind person do?

If this is your first time listening to this podcast, I’d encourage you to take a listen to the archives. We indirectly answer that question in many episodes where we profile different individuals most often impacted by some degree of blindness or low vision.

Today we’re going to continue with our look at Audio Description or what some around the globe call descriptive video. Specifically, the opportunities available for Blind and low vision people in the creation process.

To do this, I reached out to Colleen Connor. Colleen is a podcaster, web accessibility tester, Audio Description Consultant and Co-founder of Audio Description Training Retreats.

Diagnosed with Cone Rod Dystrophy as a child, Colleen lost most of her usable vision by her Junior year in high school.

CC:

I’m grateful to my parents because they didn’t treat me any differently. I’m a black belt in Tai Kwon Do, participated in school fully and never was held back from doing anything. And so you know I decided to super, super logically major in musical theater (Laughs…).

[TR in conversation with CC:]
Laughs…

CC:

because that’s so practical.
[TR in conversation with CC:]
What did your parents say about that, about that choice?

CC:

I think they just wanted me to be able to do what I wanted and what I was good at. They weren’t thrilled but they didn’t actively stop me. They knew how passionate I was about theater and acting and studying dialects and singing.

TR:

Colleen’s introduction to audio description isn’t what you might have suspected.

CC:
I ended up working in the Spy Museum in Washington DC. They had a described tour there but it was very out of date.

TR:

Guess what Colleen offered

CC:

Hey I’m visually impaired, can I update this for you. And I was too Naive to ask for money. Much like a lot of my work I did it for free.

I was in theater and musical theater almost my entire life and I had no idea that Audio Description existed. No one had ever told me about it. I didn’t know it was something I could ask for. Once I discovered the audio tours in museums someone mentioned to me about Audio Description of plays and musicals and live theater and I was blown away. And then of course I discovered that they were also doing Audio Description for film and television.

TR:

That project at the Spy Museum?

CC:

I rewrote this tour. I added some tactile elements. People were really impressed by it. I got hired by Cortina Productions after that to work on the audio tour of the George W. Bush Heritage Library and Museum in Texas.

TR:

Doing the work and having it well received is great, but AD meant more to Colleen.

CC:

This could be kind of my way back into theater. I started looking into it realizing that there isn’t a lot of training.

TR:

Maybe you’re familiar with the saying, get in where you fit in. That’s what Colleen did.

CC:

As those of us who can’t see we are the users of Audio Description. Therefore it’s my belief that we are your best source of quality control. We are your best source of feedback. One of the things that I started doing was critiquing people. So I would contact people whether it was from a live show or a TV show or film and I would say here are some notes about your description. I thought you did this well, I think this could be an improvement, I don’t think you should have used this voice artist. I started from a place of editing and critiquing.

[TR in conversation with CC:]

How was that received?

CC:

Sometimes it just straight up wasn’t. (Laughs…)
So my messages are somewhere in the ether, I’m sure. Other times people were amazed and then especially as far as live they were very hungry for feedback and critique because they do these shows and half the time nobody’s even listening to their description and so to get legitimate feedback. Some people have an ego about it they think they’re infallible but most of the time people are like thank you so much , what else.

So I realized in a sense it would be ideal if you have people teaching audio description or if someone was an audio describer to have a consultant who is visually impaired or blind who is a user of the experience.

TR:

While in the role of Quality Control Consultant during a conference, Colleen came across another opportunity.

CC:

I met my business partner Jan Vulgaropulos and she is a professional Audio Describer.

TR:

Jan, who specialized in live theater description had a question for Colleen.

CC:

Listen, I’m thinking of starting my own training. Would you do it with me and start a company?

I said yes, let’s do it lets create something new! We both decided that rather than a classroom kind of conference where you’re there for two days 8 to 5 with fluorescent lighting in a hotel trying to get the basics of Audio Description that we would create Audio Description Training Retreats, which is our company, and we would have people in sort of a natural environment . We would do courses in Audio Description . That has become part of my passion and my focus.

TR:

Back to the earlier question; what sort of work can Blind people do? In this case as it pertains to Audio Description.

CC:

I’m not only there to give the student’s feedback, I co-teach Audio Description. I help teach them about Disability awareness and the history of Audio Description, where it comes from. The update as to what’s going on now. We go over kind of our guidelines for helping people establish Audio Description.

And then my colleague does the actual description teaching. The main goal is to give people as much feedback and performance opportunity as possible. So we have our students do a lot of description.

TR:

The hands on approach enables these future describers to figure out what aspect of Audio Description they like.

CC:

Hey you know I like writing, but I don’t want to do the voice artist thing or I don’t think I could do live theater and just say what I’m seeing in real time that’s too hard. Or they might enjoy that challenge.

TR:

I don’t want to be one to say that something can’t be done based on the current process. It may appear that way until someone comes along and changes how it’s done.

Yes, right now, live description and writing the description for a film or television show requires sight. But wordsmithing doesn’t.

What are the other challenges for a Blind person to participate in this work?

How about narration?

CC:

When you are recording in a studio, what normally happens is the script is on one screen and then on the screen next to it the film or TV show is playing and it has the time stamps on it and the Sound Engineer will say ok you have three seconds to record this line will do it three times ready? And they will play the clip and you’re watching the clip and trying to say what’s on the script at the same time.

TR:

Ok, maybe it’s me but this doesn’t seem to be a real obstacle. It’s a process that’s currently in place but there’s no reason it couldn’t be done differently.
For example, a Sound Engineer could cue the Narrator.

A Narrator/Editor with time stamp info alone could easily run through and record and be sure that the narration falls as indicated.

CC:

I think if you were doing it independently you could be successful at it. I think some of the larger studios everything has to happen so fast in post-production that they’re like you have one day to do this. You have one day to record the Audio Description and they just don’t think Blind people can do it.

[TR in conversation with CC:]
Huh!

TR:

That sounds like the biggest obstacle to me, attitude.

CC:

As far as quality control, as far as the people who should be editing, I think that should be Blind people. We’re more attuned to consuming Audio Description as our means of delving into a story and we have more of a legitimate leg up to say something like this voice over artist is super annoying and takes you of the story. The script writer repeated this line twice. At one point in the scene you named this person this and now you’re calling him this. Those kind of things are what we would be more efficient at editing.

TR:

For example, tell me if you think there’s something off with this narration.

[Audio: Shooters Season 2]

This is from season 2 of a Netflix series called “Shooters”. No offense to the Narrator but why in the world is he practically singing every line. I had to abandon the series. I just couldn’t do it. This guy!

CC:

There is room for more employment for visually impaired and Blind people. It’s just a matter of the same that it every was which is unfortunately we have to break down the barriers. We have to be the ones to say , no like we can edit, we can be involved in this, we can be voice artist, like it can happen.

TR:

Colleen is currently a member of an ACB Committee tasked to create an AD Accreditation. They’re developing guidelines that define audio description and requirements for live theater, plays, movies and television.

CC:

It’s not just for the describers, we’re also going to be creating a certification for quality control or consumers of Audio Description. My goal is to make sure that Blind and visually impaired people have a chance to also be certified as quality control and as description consultants.

TR:

When it comes to standards and guidelines for creating Audio Description, there’s a lot of room for growth. How to handle diversity is just one question.

CC:

How much do you say about a person? How do you very quickly categorize somebody if you need a really short term for this one burly guy?What do you say? What’s appropriate to say? What terms are you going to use that may in five in a year, may be no longer appropriate?

A lot of times you may want to reference something, but the main default as far as guidelines will most likely be only if it’s relevant to the story do you need to reference something and then you need to keep in mind you have to reference for everybody because that’s why it would be significant.

TR:

To learn more about Audio Description Training Retreats you can reach them on Facebook or Twitter @ADRetreats or visit ADTrainingRetreats.com.

They have some trainings taking place this fall so go on over to the site and get all the information.

[TR in conversation with CC:]

And your podcast? The name and where can folks take a listen?

CC:

My personal kind of podcast and any of my videos and information can be found at BlindInspirationCast.com

TR:

I’ll have all of these links at ReidMyMind.com on the episodes post.

Shout out to Colleen Connor for taking the time to speak with me for this episode.

I think we may hear from her again in the future regarding AD and more. She and I have some things in common. For example, like when I asked her to try using headphones during our interview and I noticed she too like me enjoys making up songs about nothing.

CC:

Humming a tune…

“Getting my headset!”

[TR in conversation with CC:]

Laughs!

# Closing

TR:

Hey, I’m not sure if you all know this but right now, there’s an incredible sale taking place just about wherever podcasts are distributed.

It costs nothing, absolutely nada, free 99 to subscribe to a podcast including this one. So do yourself a favor and…

Subscribe!
Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, Stitcher, Tune In Radio or wherever you get podcasts.

You can always send me feedback or recommend a guest or topic all you have to do is hollaback!

We have the comments section on the blog, ReidMyMind.com.
The email; ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com
The Reid My Mind Radio Feedback Line where you can leave a voice mail: 1 570-798-7343

I would really love voice messages that I can share on the podcast. If you don’t want to call, you can grab your smart phone and record a voice memo and email the finished recording to ReidMyMindRadio@gmail.com.

I’d love to hear and share the voices of those who are listening. If you want to send a message but don’t want it shared just say so and it’s all good.

I appreciate you listening and if you liked what you heard please rate and even review the show via Apple Podcast. And please, tell a friend to listen. Spread the love, man!

You can always visit www.ReidMyMind.com, that’s R to the E I D like my last name!

Audio: Reid My Mind Radio Outro

Peace!

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